October 5, 2010

Every time I fly, drive, or take the island ferry back to Toronto, I feel a sense of coming home. There is something about our city – its beauty and its flaws – that makes Toronto the place that I will always call home.

I was raised to fix things that break, to build things that last, and to make long-term decisions rather than short-term mistakes. Over the years I developed a hobby of restoring old homes to their original splendor. I know how to use a drill, a chop saw, and a hammer. I can do electrical, plumbing, and drywall.

My calloused hands are rough compared to the soft and often sweaty hands of the politicians I shake after each debate. I am the only woman on stage and yet the only one with rough hands scarred by hard work. I’m often asked what makes me different from the other candidates and I usually look down at my hands before answering.

I am the only candidate who has experience building companies from the ground up, bringing change to an entire industry, forming a vision, and leading others towards that vision – and the only one with calloused hands.

Like that of most entrepreneurs, my leadership style is collaborative – it takes collaboration to build a business from the ground up. And like most entrepreneurs I’ve learned how to sell good ideas and build consensus. I know the importance of negotiation, and I value change for the opportunities it can bring.

Before putting my name on the ballot for Mayor of Toronto, I approached the role as any entrepreneur would. I studied the city, looking for opportunities to do things better, for areas where change would bring huge success. I met with all sorts of people – from bus drivers, parks workers, and maintenance crews to neighborhood associations, and people in management positions at the city.

I discovered the main problem with our municipal government is the lack of communication between city council, management, front-line workers, and the people of our city. It is the cause of all our over-spending, our poor planning, and our failing transit system.

Without strong communication between city council, our front lines, management, and our people, most decisions – whether they be spending, planning, or transit – are uninformed. We must restructure the communication process.

It won’t be easy, but nothing worth doing is easy. It will take re-engagement with the people of Toronto, who have had the doors of the city locked to them for years. Public consultation must come first and foremost – before planning, before policy, before any city decisions are made.

I have a vision of a Toronto where our youth, our business owners, our entrepreneurs, and our people get a better shot at achieving their goals. A city where an extensive subway system joins mixed-income communities; where mixed-use zoning and lower business taxes allow our businesses to thrive; a city where our high-priority neighbourhoods become strong, flourishing communities.

Join me in working towards this vision.

To find out how you can help achieve this vision please go to www.sarahthomson.ca or call the Sarah Thomson for Mayor Campaign office at 416-964-5850.

Approved by the CFO of the Sarah Thomson for Mayor Campaign.


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