Why is no one #PrayingForEgypt?

Over 300 people were killed Friday during a militant attack on a mosque in northern Sinai. At least 27 were children. The last number of wounded was recorded at 128.

During the imam’s sermon, the attackers opened fire. They were positioned at the doors and windows, which meant no one could escape. Explosions erupted. Officials say at least two dozen people carrying a black Daesh banner were shooting into the crowd of innocent worshippers.

It is being called one of the deadliest assault by Islamic extremists in modern history.

And yet — no one is praying for Egypt on social media.

In November 2016, 128 people died in a suicide bombing and shooting in Paris. Six worshipers were killed and 19 injured when a lone gunman fired into a Quebec mosque in January. In June, a bomb went off at an Ariana Grande’s concert in Manchester. Twenty two people died. The Las Vegas shooting left 58 people dead and 546 injured.

In each of these occasions, people #prayed. They filtered their social media pictures and marked themselves “safe” on Facebook. You couldn’t open Twitter without seeing a heart emoji or a trending hashtag. Families sat in their living rooms watching CNN or CBC, glued to the television screen in horrified silence.

And yet, an attack that left over 300 people dead received little public attention. There was no Facebook check-in that I’m aware of. No image filter. There was a trending hashtag – #PrayForEgypt – but most of the people using it were from the region or had a connection to the region.

On my own social media feed, there was practically nothing. I pride myself on following a diverse set of people, but still my westernized twitter lists had very little information on the tragedy, and even less personal messages. The same people who prayed for Manchester were not praying for Egypt.

Why the discrepancy? Is it because Egypt is a predominately Muslim country or that the atrocity took place in a mosque? Is it because the country is not a typical Western ally? Is it because people just don’t care about things that don’t happen in their home or neighbouring countries?

The news has reported the incident, but it has been largely overshadowed by the political shakeup in Zimbabwe or the engagement of Prince Harry. That’s not an excuse, but a reality of the news cycle. It’s up to everyone to individually pay attention to what is happening around the world and not pass judgement on who to care about.

Three hundred people are dead. Twenty-seven children are dead. Their only sin is that they were praying in a mosque frequented by Sufis, one of the muslim sects in Egypt.

Whether it’s a shooting at a popular tourist attraction, a bombing in a war-torn country like Iraq, or a shooting in a place of worship in Egypt, a human life is a human life. If you are going to pray for one, you should pray for all.

#PrayFor Egypt.

Featured image provided by Andini Prian . 

‘Toronto Stronger’ sign rightfully upsets Bostonians — and everyone else

Last night’s game between Boston and Toronto was a tragedy of its own kind for fans of the Leafs, but for one fan the line between the world of hockey-mania and real world tragedy went out the window in favour of bad taste.

The fan in question was spotted outside the Air Canada Centre holding a sign reading ‘Toronto Stronger’ — a tacky playoff slogan if there ever was one, considering that ‘Boston Strong’ is the phrase Bostonians used to express their community, grief, and fear last month when a terrorist bombing tore through the Boston Marathon killing three and wounding hundreds.

The Toronto fan’s sign is even complete with a ribbon, a symbol generally reserved for tragedies or diseases.

Toronto fans, has it really been that long since the Leafs made the playoffs that you have forgotten decency? Of course, it was only one man in a crowd, but one would expect, in a world of common decency and reverence, that this photo would show this man getting a tongue-lashing from a fen beside him.

The Toronto fan did later get his due for brainlessness from Boston fans when his photo hit Twitter:

And Toronto fans alike:

Hopefully the young man in the photo has learned a lesson that, apparently, no one else needed to learn: Making fun of national tragedies, especially one month after the fact, won’t go over too well with pretty much anyone.