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Fun gift ideas for your kids this Christmas

I’m sure your holiday shopping list is already long enough, but have you started actually buying your holiday gifts yet? When it comes to the children in our lives, whether it’s your own kids, nephews, nieces or little cousins, the best gifts you can give them during the holidays is a sense of family and fun. But, they will still be looking out for gifts from Santa under that tree, so here are some toy ideas for the little ones in your life, or maybe for yourself because we are all kids at heart.

Colouring Books

So, colouring books have changed a lot since the 90s. Somehow, within the last year or so, colouring books became fun again, with many targeting adults as a stress reliever. With that being said, there are many options available for kids with beautiful illustrations. If your kids are into Harry Potter, consider getting them a Harry Potter Colouring book by Scholastic. This book also comes with many different options under the HP theme, including magical creatures and magical places. This book is recommended for ages 8-99 on the Scholastic website.

Personalized Bedtime Book

This one is definitely geared towards the younger kids. Give them the opportunity to get excited while seeing a character of themselves come to life in a version of their favourite bedtime story. Places like Me Bookz lets you choose your storyline, upload a picture of your child, add in details, and place your order for a hard copy version of your child’s story. You can also add an additional character to the story, just in case you want to add in your child’s favourite/ or annoying sibling. This gift is definitely something your child can hold onto and cherish even as they get older.

Chocolate Pen

If you have a little one that’s chocolate obsessed, why not give them the unique and yummy option of writing with a chocolate pen. This isn’t an actual pen made of chocolate, but a pen that dispenses liquid chocolate which hardens at room temperature. This opportunity allows your child to draw little 3-D versions of their treats before they eat them. This makes decorating cookies even easier and promotes creativity for your child. The Chocolate Pen also comes with different colours of chocolate, including white chocolate, pink and blue. The kit also comes with different candy moulds so your child can feel like a true master chocolatier.

PlayStation 4 Slim/ Nintendo Switch

If you have a child, or even a teenager that’s been after you to get the Playstation 4 , but you’re not willing to commit to the price, try going slimmer. The Playstation 4 Slim was released late last year and costs a fraction of the original Playstation 4. if you’re looking for the hottest option this year, price aside, the Nintendo Switch is generating a lot of positive buzz in the gaming world.

Hatchimals

This is an interesting one. I’ve seen it quite a lot of them while shopping around. The Hatchimals seems to be the latest craze for young kids, where children can watch and wait in anticipation as their new toy pet hatches out of an egg. This magical egg offers a thrilling surprise as your children learn about nurturing and love. Hatchimals even comes with a surprise twin option or various different critters that your child can watch grow.

Popin Cookin Kits

Unusual, cute and unique, these Popin Cookin kits by Kracie are popular in placed like Japan, where users of all ages are invited to craft miniature versions of food. I will admit, I have watched many You Tube videos on this trend and it’s quite fascinating. Your kids can craft miniature donuts, hamburgers, complete with fries and a soda or even sushi, pizza and ramen. These kits can be ordered on Amazon or maybe you can find one in a random grocery store in Little Italy like I did.

An Experience Coupon

This may be the most creative gift you give your child or children in your life. Think about their interests and take them on a fun outing for the holidays. Maybe it’s a trip to the spa to pamper your princess with her first manicure or a trip to the aquarium to delight them with creatures of the sea. Any memories made are worth more than a dozen presents.

Merry Christmas Shopping and let us know in the comments below what you plan to buy for your kids.

Have a Caribbean inspired Christmas in Toronto

What’s Christmas like in your home country ? I recently started thinking about the way people hold different Christmas traditions close to their heart. Some people dream of snow on Christmas and look forward to icy winters and warm hot chocolate. Christmas for me, however, has been different, growing up in a tropical country. If you can’t physically go to the Caribbean and experience the holiday season for yourself, here are some ways to have an island-inspired Christmas.

Caribbean Foods

Everyone loves good food — it’s one of the driving factors at every holiday celebration, no matter the culture. One of the more popular Christmas dishes you can expect to find in mostly all the islands is Christmas rum cake. This is a sponge cake with various dried fruits that has been soaked in rum, after baking. Splash more rum on the cake to add delicious flavour as well as preserve the cake for almost up to a year. Just don’t go too heavy on the rum or you’ll  become intoxicated from eating to much cake. Also, try Caribbean classics like sorrel punch and ginger beer.

Caribbean Decor

When you think of the islands, you think of warm sunshine and lots of palm trees! Palm trees are an amazing way to add a tropical touch to any room. Certain design ideas include making a Christmas wreath out of palm leaves or the funniest one that’s been circulating  on social media is a Christmas pineapple. For people that don’t want, or have time for a tree, a pineapple can easily be decorated to invoke that Christmas island feel. For the record, I have never done this and I don’t believe this is a Caribbean tradition, but its certainly festive and island-like.

Caribbean Music

Just like for any other season of the year, the creative geniuses and musical talents originating from Trinidad and Tobago know how to make Christmas in the Caribbean lively. There is a special genre of music called Parang that originated in Venezuela and Trinidad. The music revolves around an island christmas. Soca-Parang is a mixture of Soca beats and traditional Christmas songs. Similar to carolling , in some places in Trinidad people go home to home singing parang music in exchange for treats of sorrel drink or rum punch.

Caribbean Christmas Pop-up

If you’re considering what it would be like to experience a Caribbean island Christmas, there is a special Christmas pop up market coming to Toronto on Dec 16. The pop-up market is presented by Jamaican Eats Magazine and inspires  the taste, shop and style of the Caribbean. The event will be held at the Ralph Thornton Community Centre on Queen Street East. Expect to find more rum cake, a special treasure hunt and Caribbean inspired greeting cards.

Send the gift of chocolate this holiday season

 

What says “thank you” or “thinking of you” better than a beautifully arranged and decorated chocolate platter, especially around the holidays?

Nothing — or at least that’s what Jennifer Snider, founder of Sugar Mommy Inc., believes. “It goes with it,” she said in an interview with Women’s Post. “You think of holidays you think of chocolate.”

SugarMommy is a chocolate and treats company that specializes in packaged gifts and decorative arrangements. Their clients are mostly corporate; however they also cater to special functions and seasonal occasions.

The chocolate sold by SugarMommy is different than something you may purchase at a drugstore or a specialty-shop. First of all, the chocolate is delectably smooth. Made from quality ingredients, Snider’s treats are all hand made and sold at reasonable prices. Everything is customizable, so you only get the chocolates you want.

“I use products that are gourmet, but not so gourmet that people can’t afford it,” she said. Snider made it clear she is not out to gauge anyone’s pocketbooks this holiday season — she wants people to enjoy her chocolate, even if they only have $30 to spend.

The other difference is the presentation, something Snider says gets her a lot of compliments. Her platters, pails, and baskets are all meticulously prepared, with special emphasis on colour balance and variety. Whatever you choose make sure it includes the chocolate bark. The mint white chocolate and the toasted coconut bark are absolutely divine. Other top selling items include fudge toffee, white chocolate popcorn, Oreo bark, and sponge toffee.

Every single item is put together with care to create a work of art.

“It’s really important to me,” she said. “It’s handmade stuff and if you put passion into what you do, it comes across in your work.”

Most of Snider’s clientele come from corporate offices or medical offices looking for referral gifts for their own clients. She has also expanded to provide treats for parties and events. Her pails and baskets contain individually-wrapped treats and her martini glasses can be customized to fit specific colour schemes. She describes her work more as a centrepiece than a dessert.

One of the newest additions to SugarMommy is the candy table, beautifully decorated with martini glasses and an array of colours. Snider says it’s great for kids, but also for the parents as the presentation can appear quite elegant. “People take bags and fill them up, and they go crazy. It’s unique. It’s quite different and it looks beautiful and people love it.”

Snider started making chocolate when she was a teenager. “My mom taught me how to make it and I made it as gifts,” she said. “I think it was the creativeness [I liked]. I was never a great baker. It was the creative aspect that I loved – putting things together, making things pretty.”

She went to school for early childhood education and worked in the field until 2007. With five children of her own, Snider was spending most of her time at appointments. She continued to send out her chocolaty gifts until a few friends told her she should sell her creations. She decided to teach part-time and focus on building a business that he could run from her home.

“A lot of people pushed me and said you have a great product and you need to get out there. We put some money and investment into it,” she said. “Now we have a lot of return customers. They appreciate the hand-made touch to it. It is not the mass produce look. Clients take the time to send letters and emails appreciating the gift. It is much more personal then a gift card or a lunch.”

Snider is always on the lookout for new flavours and creations! Her inspiration come from her travels, as well as the trends in the market.

Interested in sending out the gift of chocolate this year? Holiday packages are available now! Go to sugarmommy.ca to check out all of the options. 

5 tips to plan the best holiday party

Tis’ the season — the season for holiday parties that is! There is the office party, the obligatory family parties, and of course, a party for each circle of friends. It can get exhausting!!

More and more people are opting out of hosting their own parties. First of all, you have to clean your house top to bottom. Then you have to prepare music, food, alcohol, spend money on decorations, and then act as the host the entire night making sure everyone has a good time. At the same time, it can be really fun to invite all your friends and family over for an afternoon or evening of holiday cheer! Here at Women’s Post, we understand the conundrum.

That’s what we have some tips for how to throw a seamless, easy, and memorable holiday bash:

Pick a theme: While it can be amazing just to gather with friends and loved ones, the best holiday bashes have a theme. Having a theme can help with decorations, food, music, and attire — it brings a party together. It doesn’t have to be crazy. For example, you can have the very casual “wear your ugly sweater” or the more glamorous “gold and silver”.   It also gives your guests an idea of what to expect when they arrive.

Signature drink: Even if your party is BYOB, always have a signature drink or cocktail to offer guests when they arrive. The key is not to choose a drink that most of your guests will enjoy — something not too sweet, with the perfect amount of alcohol ratio. It’s also ideal to be a cocktail you can make in mass so you aren’t stuck in the kitchen all night. Sangria is a classic option, and there are plenty of ways to make it more of a holiday beverage. Try mixing white wine with white cranberry juice, some sugar and club soda. Put it in a few large pitchers with oranges, cranberries, apples, and raspberries, and let soak for a few hours. Keep sprigs of rosemary to garnish. Pour over ice! This drink is easy because you can keep everything on a bar or table and guests can help themselves. Just keep a pitcher in the fridge for latecomers.

Decorate, but don’t overdo it: I always aim for comfortable holiday decorations – a beautiful tree, a few wreaths, table runners and centrepieces with green, red, and white accents. Twinkle lights work no matter your theme. They can appear elegant, or urban-chic, and they can create some really great ambiance. Try to avoid cheesy santa statues or name tags. Keep the atmosphere warm and comfortable. Have a few playlist selections but avoid a lot of the classic orchestral music unless your theme is a bit more elegant or your event is actually a dinner party. It tends to make people sleepy and you may find your party ends before planned. Go with plastic cutlery and napkins that fit the theme.

Be creative with your canapés: Food is one of the most important parts of a party. If you aren’t hosting a dinner or doing a meal, guests will expect a few snacks, if only to soak up that sangria! The classic baked brie is a fan favourite around the holidays. Drizzle honey and rosemary overtop of a round of brie. Put it in the oven or even the microwave to heat it up. The brie should be soft enough to cut into, but not too soft as to be misinterpreted as soup. Serve with a variety of crackers, some cranberry sauce, and some red pepper jelly. Other options include spiced meats, jalapeño poppers, and a popcorn/nuts and bolts mixture. Make sure to have a variety of options for vegetarians and vegans.

Have an activity: No one hates icebreakers more than I do, but it’s always fun to have an activity, no matter how small, to get people talking. This can be a secret santa, a gift exchange, or even a decorating of a tree. Drinking games are always fun with the right crowd. It can also be something outdoors. If there is a skating rink or a park with lovely lights, organize a bit of an outing for those who want to be a bit more active.

Let us know how your party went!

5 holiday desserts from around the world

What’s the best part of travelling? For me, it’s about the local culture, including the unique foods. This holiday season, you don’t need a passport to experience any of these international cultural traditions. North American holidays are known for turkey, stuffing and an assortment of sweet and sticky pies, but what are some other holiday desserts you can find around the globe?

Women’s Post showcases five unique and decadent international desserts from different cultures that are bound to impress guests at your next holiday party:

Phillipines- Pinoy Fruit Salad

Filipino food is amazing! While known for their glazed Christmas ham or desserts like halo-halo, during the Christmas season one of the most popular sweet treats is fruit salad. Yep, fruit salad, but this isn’t any random fruit salad. Normally, Filipino fruit salad, sometimes called Pinoy fruit salad, takes one can of fruit cocktail mixed with heavy cream and sweetened condensed milk. You can also find versions with coconut meat, coconut milk, jello, tapioca pearls or added pineapple. Talk about easy, creamy and delicious.

France -Buche de Noel

This dessert might look familiar to some North American homes. Buche de Noel or Yule Log is a traditional sweet treat found in France and French-influenced countries during the Christmas holidays. It is made using a classic sponge cake coated in chocolate buttercream and rolled in chocolate shavings to resemble an actual log.

England- Christmas Pudding

Christmas pudding, Christmas pudding ! What’s Christmas without some traditional Christmas pudding, especially if you’re from the U.K. Also known as plum pudding, this dessert is usually served after Christmas dinner and is made using a mixture of dried fruit,spices, molasses. There are no plums in the actual pudding, but lots of raisins. The pudding is often steamed for approximately three hours. Many people often soak the fruits before hand in Brandy  and once the pudding is done it is splashed with more alcohol. This helps to preserve the pudding for almost up to one year,

Guyana- Black Cake

Similar in look to the christmas pudding, this cake is made using minced dried fruits that have been soaked in cherry brandy or rum The fruits are mixed with flour, eggs and sugar, spices and molasses or browning. Once baked, the cakes are generously soaked in rum. This Christmas treat can be found in many Caribbean islands including Jamaica and Trinidad. Black Cake or Caribbean fruit cake are also popular at weddings and is said to bring prosperity and luck.

Australia- Pavlova

Even though it’s technically summer in Australia during the Christmas holidays, this doesn’t mean that Australians can’t indulge in a refreshing Christmas- summer dessert treat. This popular meringue- like dessert is named after Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova after she toured New Zealand and Australia in the 1920’s. Pavlova is made using egg whites, sugar, and cream, but it has a firm and crunchy exterior and a delicate inside. This dessert is usually served on Christmas day.

What are your favourite global holiday desserts? Comment and indulge!

Why do we feel down during the holidays

No matter how much you may love the holiday season — the seasonal hot drinks, the ice skating, the markets, and of course, the holiday itself — it does come with added stresses.

The stress of hosting events, of having to mingle with your coworkers, and of needing to find the perfect gift can be overwhelming. And then there is the lonely factor. For those without partners, every romantic christmas fairytale movie is a stab to the heart. It doesn’t matter how many parties you are invited to or how many people send you holiday cards — December and January can be lonely months with no one to kiss under the mistletoe. Finally, there is the cold weather. The constant grey skies and the fact that it gets dark by 5 p.m. can take it’s toil on the human body. 

So, what do you do when you start to get these feelings? Here are five options that may help:

Take time for yourself: No, this does not mean take time to shop for others or go out with friends. This is serious me time. Go get a manicure or a facial, get your hair done, go for a walk in the snow, or read a book with some hot cocoa. During this time, try not to think about what you still have left for you. Use these few hours to tune in with nature or escape into a good story. Only by taking time for yourself will you be able to manage the rest of the holiday season.

Slow down: Try not to get overwhelmed by that long list of holiday “to-dos”. Make a list, and take everything one day at a time. Try to split your weekend between “holiday days” and “me time”. If you spend your entire weekend shopping, baking, decorating, and going from event to event, come Monday you will be exhausted before you even get to work.

Tap into your feelings: Why do you feel lonely? What are your fears? What is really stressing you out? Sometimes, all of these feelings crash together, making it very difficult to resolve. Take a moment to tap into what you are feeling and determine their origins. Once you know what triggered your stress, you can either avoid it or you can learn to cope with it. Unfortunately, it’s not an easy process. If you need support, ask a friend or close family member to sit down with you and talk it out.

Spend time with loved ones: While you may feel alone at your friend’s party, it’s still important to go. Staying at home, thinking about the feelings you are experiencing, can sometimes aggravate the situation. Pick and choose your moments to mingle. If you aren’t feeling like a full-blown holiday shindig, ask your friends to go get some brunch or see a movie. Do something low key. The important thing is to recognize that you have people in your lives who want to spend time with you — even if it is just one person!

Start something new: This is my personal favourite option. When I’m feeling down, I like to start a project. First of all, it gives my mind something to think about besides the problems plaguing me during the holidays and second of all, it feels really good to try something new. This can be something small like trying yoga or committing to a paint night every month. Choose something that you enjoy or that you’ve always wanted to try. Keep in mind this isn’t a New Year’s resolution. There is no need to choose anything to do with health, fitness, or any sort of physical or mental transformation. Just pick something that you will find fun!

What do you do to conquer the holiday blues?

6 holiday traditions from different parts of the world

What does Christmas mean to you? This holiday is celebrated all over the world. For some, it’s all about the brightly lit streets and crowded stores, with people all looking for presents to share with their loved ones, but for others the holiday can be more about tradition or spiritual guidance. The interesting part is that the commonality is family, gift-giving, and myth.

Here are six Christmas customs from around the world:

Japan

In Japan, Christmas is not a national holiday, but it is still celebrated by many people in the country. There is no Santa Claus. Instead there is Santa Kurohsu. Santa Kurohsu takes after a Buddhist monk in Japanese culture, who would travel to peoples homes to leave gifts and was said to have eyes at the back of his head to observe if children were being naughty. Strangely, the Japanese tend to eat a lot of KFC during the week of Christmas, thanks to clever marketing dating back to the eighties. Their unofficial ‘Christmas cake’ is strawberry shortcake.

Norway

Christmas in Norway is known as Jul and is celebrated on Dec 25. However, the gift-giving is done on Christmas eve. One of the most interesting customs is that all brooms are hidden on Christmas eve. This way, it can’t be stolen for use by evil spirits or witches.

Venezuela

Residents in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela, adore Christmas. Venezuela is a predominantly a Catholic country so going to mass on Christmas is necessary, but it’s just the method of getting there that’s odd. Residents in Caracas can be seen roller-blading to church mass in the earl morning hours, and it’s so popular that the roads are often cleared of traffic and a special path is provided. Venezuelan’s celebrate Nochebuena, which is seen as the night before Christmas, where families exchange gifts and eat a full christmas dinner.

Italy

Christmas celebrations start eight days before Christmas in Italy, with many families headed to mass. Families offer special Novenas (prayers) and typically gather on Christmas Eve for a midnight celebration. On Christmas eve, no meat is eaten with the exception of a light seafood dish. More importantly, in Italian tradition, children await Befana, a friendly witch that travels to children’s homes to fill their stocking with gifs. This night is known as Epiphany or feast of the Three Kings, which is celebrated 12 days after Christmas, on Jan. 6.

Czech Republic

One of the most interesting Christmas traditions is reserved for single or unmarried women. An unmarried woman must stand with her back facing an open door and throw a shoe over her shoulder. If the front of the shoe lands facing the door, she is to wed within the next 12 months. It also signifies possible love in the new year. In the Czech Republic and other European countries, they also celebrate St Nicholas Day, on Dec. 5, where children wait for St Nicholas to arrive with angels and with devils. The devil might give you a lump of coal while an angel will give you sweets or fruit once a child sings a song or recites a poem for St Nicholas.

Ukraine

The Christmas trees tend to look a lot different in Ukraine, as they are often decorated with artificial spiders and webbing. Instead of the colourful balls and happy tinsel, the tree might look like a scene out of a Halloween tell. However, the story behind this Ukrainian Christmas tradition is rather fascinating. As the tale goes —an old woman was once unable to afford decorations for her tree, but when she woke on Christmas morning, she instead found a spider, who decorated the tree with it’s shimmering web.

Do you have a Christmas tradition or custom you know about? Comment below

Lyft brings competition to Uber just in time for the holidays

Lyft is coming to Toronto!

Lyft is the second most popular ride-hailing app and has been around in the United States since 2012, three years after the launch of Uber.  The service will make their first introduction to the international market in Toronto, with a plan to start their business up by the end of the year. This will provide a healthy dose of competition for Uber, a company that is not that popular within the city. In October of 2015, Toronto city council amended a bylaw allowing Uber to operate after the company was hit with a lawsuit filed by the taxi and limo drivers industry in Toronto.

Uber welcomes the competition from Lyft, as Lyft’s president John Zimmer said in a statement. “We see [Toronto] as a world class city. It will likely become one of our top five markets overall,” he said. “As a city, that really shares the values that we have at Lyft- focusing on people taking care of people, treating people well, treating people with mutual respect, and promoting both inclusion and diversity.”

While Uber has faced criticism in the past few months in some major cities, including London and Montreal, Lyft has been increasing its market share in the U.S. and even recorded a growth of  $1.6 billion in financing this past year alone. The company says they are now worth $11bn. In May 2017 , Lyft struck a deal with Google’s Waymo, in order to develop self-driving cars.

The services offered by Lyft are very similar to Uber, complete with reduced prices. But, the launch of  Lyft is  also drawing criticism from the taxi industry operating in Toronto. Beck Taxi, one of the more popular taxi services operating in Toronto, said that Lyft can generate the same amount of negative consequences as Uber, referencing sex assault cases. This all has to do with the qualifications and background information of available drivers.

Lyft has began placing calls for drivers. They plan to launch next month, just in time for the holidays. Lyft will be operating in the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton and have released five options that Torontonians can look forward to:

  • Regular vehicles for up to four passengers
  • Vehicles that can carry six passengers ( The plus service)
  • High end cars ( premier)
  • Luxury black cars ( Lux and Lux SUV )

No pricing information has been released, but it is expected to be in the same range as Uber pricing, hopefully with promotional discounts considering this will be their Toronto launch. Lyft has also announced it has its eyes on other major cities, including London, U.K..

It will be interesting to see how different Lyft will be in comparison to Uber and how the Toronto Taxi industry will continue to survive.

What are your thoughts on Lyft launching in Toronto and will you be trying this over Uber ? Comment below.

What the hell is a basic bitch?

Apparently, I am “basic”.

When I was told this, I immediately took it as an insult. Does this mean I’m naive or dumb? Does this mean I have no depth or that I can’t make an informed argument? Is this an insinuation of intolerance?

No — it all centres on my choice of drink, television shows, and music preferences. All of that combined makes me a #basicbitch. While some are embracing this new label (because what other choice is there), I find it just as offensive as my own personal definition.

Being “basic” is slang for someone who follows trends and lacks individuality. It is a term used to describe a person — particularly white women — who enjoy seasonal drinks, chic clothes, and healthy goods. A basic bitch watches Love Actually every Christmas, gets excited for pumpkin spice lattes, can quote Friends in any conversation, wears Uggs and leggings, and shops at Whole Foods.

This term has been circulating the Internet for about a year now, and doesn’t seem to be going away. If you google it, the term is synonymous with the word “airhead”.

Now, I know I’m not an airhead. I don’t brainlessly go shopping or talk like a valley girl. I’m an editor and a writer. I am capable of talking about anything from business, law and politics to fashion, food, and design. I am tolerant, intelligent, and I have a quick wit. I enjoy listening to other people argue about topics I don’t agree with because it exposes me to new perspectives. I love going to local coffee shops, watching documentaries, and reading.

At the same time, I enjoy a good peppermint mocha and will go to a Christmas market at least three times throughout the month of December. I practice yoga twice a week. I like going to health food stores and I love my blanket scarf. Do my consumption choices or habits overweigh the other aspects of my personality? Apparently so.

Ironically, the word “basic” is a lazy insult. It requires little thought and no creativity. It’s such a blanket term that very few people actually know what it means. Calling a woman “basic” is another way of saying “I have absolutely nothing to say about you as a human being so instead I’m going to make fun of you for what you are wearing, eating, and whatever activities you are doing over the weekend.” It’s a way of making people feel ashamed of who they are without actually pinpointing why they should feel ashamed.

It also shows an incredible lack of understanding into what makes a person an individual. I think you’ll find that most people are quite complex, and that just because a woman relishes in very female (I say with rolled eyes and air quotes) activities and likes to follow certain trends, that doesn’t determine who she is.

And yet, despite these arguments, the term it’s sticking. There are hundreds of quizzes online that will help you determine how “basic” you are. People are commenting on Instagram and Facebook with things like “so basic” every time a woman posts a travel photo of herself on the beach in a bikini or tasting a novelty dessert.

To me, the term “basic” is void of any meaning. It gives people the opportunity to mock and shame women for just being themselves. And anytime women are shamed for their personalities, society loses.

Let me put it another way: call me “basic” one more time and you’ll find out exactly what kind of a bitch I can be.

Top 5 festive events to check out this month

As one holiday disappears, another one approaches. It’s almost time for those festive peppermint drinks and fancy light displays.  The weather will get colder and soon all you’ll want to do is cuddle up in a warm blanket and stay inside. Instead, try to get outdoors and take advantage of some spectacular winter markets and activities that will put you in the festive mood.

Winter Festival of Lights—Niagara Falls

Presented by the Ontario Power Company, the winter festival of lights transforms the Niagara Falls region into a mesmerizing winter wonderland. Founded 35 years ago, this is the largest illuminating festival in Canada. Enjoy a showcase of winter lights, animations and lots of activities in the Clifton Hill district, including a free nightly laser light show. The Festival of Lights runs from Nov 18-Jan 31.

Niagara Falls at night

Cavalcade of Lights—Nathan Phillips Square—downtown Toronto

The Cavalcade of Lights is the official kickoff to the winter season in the busy Toronto core. Lights, live music, ice skating, and fireworks will take over the square all in anticipation of the main event, which includes the lighting of Toronto’s official Christmas tree. Usually the tree is 15 to 18 metres high and takes almost two weeks to decorate and string with lights. This year’s tree lighting takes place on Nov 25. The lights and tree will remain through the early start of the new year.

Cavalcade of Lights

Swedish Christmas Fair—Toronto Harbourfront

Harbourfront Centre in Toronto is home to many activities in the summer and the winter. In addition to winter skating at the Natrel Rink and Dj Skate night on the weekends, there will be a two-day Taste of Sweden Christmas Fair. The festival will include Swedish folk dance, arts and craft for children, handmade crafts, and speciality-imported Swedish treats. The fair will take place Nov 25-26 and admission is free.

Swedish Christmas Buns

Illuminite—Yonge-Dundas Square

For the 10th year, Yonge-Dundas square will transform into a space of christmas lights,  music, and dance. The night features live music from pop-rock quartet Jane’s Party, and the night will continue with an on-site DJ playing christmas classics to put you in the Christmas mood. There will also be a tree lighting show and dazzling dancers in the square. Illuminite is on Nov 18, 5:30 PM- 7:30 PM.

 Toronto Christmas Market—The Distillery District

A winter classic in the City of Toronto, the distillery district is known for transforming into a cozy Christmas market and is ranked one of the best holiday markets in the world. Complete with shopping, entertainment, food, and Santa, the christmas market will make you fall in love with the holiday season. The market runs from Nov. 16-Dec. 24. On the opening night there will be a special tree lighting ceremony at 6pm.

Did we miss anything? Let us know in the comments below!