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Will you listen to the TTC’s ‘Rush Hour’ or ‘Hush Hour’ playlists?

Commuting in and out of the city can be a bore — unless you have some beats to help you pass the time!

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) is partnering with Universal Music to introduce “Tracks on Tracks”, an exclusive Apple Music program for commuters in Toronto. This program will include two TTC-branded playlists — ‘Rush Hour’ with upbeat songs and ‘Hugh Hour’ with more serene choices — featuring Canadian artists like Drake, OneRepublic, Shawn Mendes, and Alessia Cara.

“The TTC takes you where you are going and music transports you to another world,” said Universal Music Canada President and CEO Jeffrey Remedios, in a statement. “It’s fantastic to be announcing a program built to help guide Toronto riders’ musical experience, reflecting the heartbeat and pulse of our city.”

Each playlist will include about two hours worth of music and will be refreshed every Friday. The idea between the two playlists is to help suit the mood of each commute. The ‘Rush Hour’ playlist will help commuters get energized in the morning and the ‘Hush Hour’ is meant to help you relax you at the end of the day.

This is a unique and fabulous partnership for the TTC. I can’t ride into work without seeing people plugged in to their phones, listening to music or podcasts. A TTC-designated music playlist is a great way to interact with those commuters and make those rush hour and hush hour moments a little more enjoyable.

Tracks on Tracks is only available on Apple Music. Users can stream these playlists on Apple Music or download them so they can listen offline. Check them out at applemusic.com/hushhour and applemusic.com/rushhour.

Sigh, I wish I still had my old Iphone.

Jennifer Keesmaat leaving position as Toronto Chief Planner

Toronto Chief Planner Jennifer Keesmaat has announced she will be leaving her position with the city as of Sept. 29th “to pursue other interests.”

“It’s been an honour to work with Mayor Tory, Council, City staff and my remarkable team in the City Planning division over the last five years,” said Keesmaat in a statement. “I promised myself that after five years in public service I would review my future options. I look forward to new challenges in the important business of city building now enriched by invaluable lessons, new friends and colleagues acquired while serving the people of our great city, Toronto.”

Keesmaat has been a strong leader for the City of Toronto. She was never afraid to confront her colleagues in council or on committees, answering their questions with poise. When asked about how she deals with the politics of city building, Keesmaat always answered with respect for the democratic process and government accountability. With her aide, Toronto has begun its transformation into a more liveable and walkable city. One example is the council-approved Transit Network Plan, which will connect all regions of the GTA together under the “motherlode” of transit plans. And then there is the King Street Pilot, something that may revolutionize how Torontonians view the downtown core.

During her tenure, she also started a podcast called Invisible Cities, which touches on numerous aspects of city building. Through this podcast, listeners are able to hear her passion and the joy she gets from discussing things like density, green spaces, and automated cars.

In July, Women’s Post presented Keesmaat with the City Builder Glass Slipper Award for her dedication and leadership. It was an absolute pleasure to have her as a partner and Women’s Post wishes her the best of luck in her future endeavours.

School names aren’t the problem — it’s the education

Remembering our past is the only way to ensure history doesn’t repeat itself.

The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario passed a motion last week calling for school districts to rename schools and buildings named after Sir John A. Macdonald. The reasoning behind this motion is that Canada’s first prime minister played a key role in developing residential schools.

It seems that after centuries of honouring former politicians, inventors, and explorers, society is suddenly realizing their faults — and determining they should not be celebrated. Confederate statues across the United States are being torn down and/or removed after protests and political activists pointed out they are associated with white supremacy and European colonization.

As a history major, I’m well aware there are parts of Canada’s past that are unsavoury. America’s history as a whole is bloody. Our ancestors, as much as we would like to deny it, did some truly horrible things. But, can we acknowledge this past without erasing or ignoring the many accomplishments that helped shape our country? I guess that is the big question nowadays.

For example: John A Macdonald may not have been the ideal role model, but he was integral to the creation of Canada and its first government. Is that not something that should be honoured and recognized?

Residential schools are a part of Canada’s past that is embarrassing, tragic, and simply horrifying, but changing the name of a school won’t erase the pain and suffering they caused. The teacher’s union has said they want this motion to create a conversation — but as teachers, can this be done in a more effective way? It’s a teachers job to make sure children learn their history, science, art, and math. Wouldn’t it be better to incorporate these omissions into a curriculum rather than change the name of a sign in front of a building? As someone with friends who went to a school called Étienne Brûlé, I can attest to the fact that very few knew, or cared, who he was.

I am sure there are many qualified and deserving people in Canada’s history who should be honoured with their name on a school. I agree there should be statues of women, people of colour, and Indigenous leaders in front of schools, hospitals, and government buildings. But, I don’t agree that history can be changed just because we are ashamed of it.

Ultimately, a school name is just a name. If the teacher’s union really wants to make an impact — maybe they should focus on education and not media grabs like this one.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments below!

Hot and new fall TV shows to watch out for

September and October are a TV junkies’ dream, with the hottest new shows premiering across all networks.

Every year we are blessed with new shows that stick around for years — gems such as Empire, This is US, Scandal, Chicago Fire, The Blacklist, and others that are huge successes. While it can be hard to tell which new shows will make it, it’s always exciting to test them out and add them to your cozy evening fall lineup. Women’s Post has decided to compile a list of the most buzzworthy new shows, reboots, and spinoffs coming to your television screen this season.

NEW SHOWS

For The People: ( ABC/NBC) TBA

In true Shondaland style, this new drama follows a group of young lawyers navigating their first cases. Classed as the new look of justice this show offers up lots of drama and juicy cases.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KjnaAd2sO4]

Alias Grace: ( CBC) September 25 2017

This highly anticipated show is based on the best selling novel by Margaret Atwood. The show follows a housekeeper in 1843 accused of murdering her employer.

The Good Doctor: ( ABC) September 25 2017

This media drama follows a paediatric surgeon with autism. The doctor will be portrayed by Freddie Highmore, who played Norman Bates from A&E’s popular Bates Motel.

Marvel’s Inhumans: ( ABC) September 29 2017

Based on the Marvel comic of the same name, this show offers a rare look into Marvel super-humans from a royal family that have decided to head back to earth.

Ten Days in the Valley: ( ABC) October 1 2017

This drama packed series follows a TV producer dealing with the disappearance of her child, revealing secrets along the way.

S.W.A.T: (CBS) November 2 2017

Two words … Shemar Moore

Me, Myself & I: (CBS) September 25 2017

This interesting take follows a man at three points in his life. This new comedic twist and storytelling looks promising.

Law and Order: True Crime ( NBC) TBA

This is the latest out of the classic Law and Order empire. Created by Dick Wolf, this show’s first season will feature a dramatization of the real life crime: The Menendez Murders.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xh01uHWc15Q

The Gifted: ( FOX) October 2 2017

Mutants have returned in this hot new fall show. The series is loosely based on Marvel’s X- Men and will have relation to some of the previous films.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTzW9rMcbzk

Life Sentence: (CW) January 2018

Despite not starting this fall, this show is still worth a mention. This feel-good comedy highlights the important part of living your best life possible. It follows a young woman who learns she is cancer free and no longer terminally ill.

 

SPIN OFF’S 

Young Sheldon- A spinoff prequel for the popular TV show, Big Bang Theory

College-ish – A spinoff of Blask-ish

REBOOTS

2017 might be the year of reboots, and I’m not mad about it. Are you excited for Will & Grace and Roseanne?

 

Did we miss any? Let us know in the comments below which fall tv shows you are most excited for.

Is this the end? Will we suffer an apocalypse via eclipse

As people worldwide wore silly glasses and looked to the sky to witness this once-in-a-lifetime-actually-nevermind-it-may-happen-again-in-seven-years event, I stayed inside, huddled in a corner of my office, pondering the meaning of it all. The sun was being blocked out and the world threw a party! What does this mean for our future?!

I watched the live-stream from the safety of my workplace, wondering how everyone could be so calm. Doesn’t this act of God prove how tiny and insignificant we all are? In the darkness of space, time is lost. Without time, aren’t we just drifting, endlessly without any goals or sense of purpose? Is that what this eclipse was meant to teach us?

But what if it’s not about time at all. Maybe the universe is trying to tell us that darkness is coming and that we need to get used to it. The apocalypse is nigh. I realize this eternal darkness may not happen for a few years, but really, if the world is going to end, do I need to do those dishes? Why bother going into work? Those pesky responsibilities don’t matter now. You know what does? Stock piling canned goods and toilet paper! Do you have your go-bag ready? Leave your love ones behind! It’s probably too late for them. Every woman for herself!

Sure, most people will be distracted by the beauty of the eclipse. The magic of space or something insane like that, but don’t let that fool you! Your hurting eyes are only a warning of what’s to come…

Charlottesville: can it happen here? Yes, it can.

It’s seven in the morning and I’m listening to the radio. The host comes on to talk about the news of the day, describing the violence in Charlottesville once again. I’m groggy, but even I can predict the next question that will be asked — can it happen in Canada? Every day this week I’ve heard the same question. Whether it is on the radio, the television, in the newspaper, or even within my circle of family and friends, people want to talk about how what happened in the United States may, or may not, happen in their communities.

On the evening of Aug 11, a group of white nationalists — a.k.a. Nazis — marched the streets of Charlottesville in a rally that supposedly was meant to “take America” back. These people started chanting things like “white lives matter” and “blood and soil”, among many offensive and discriminatory things.

Oh, and they were holding torches and some of them held flags with the swastika.

The march was meant to be a response to the removal of a confederate statue, but considering the symbols scrawled on the signs and the slogans being screamed in the streets, there is no doubt this was a meeting of white supremacists who didn’t care about a statue. They just wanted to express their views and show their numbers.

These Nazis* were met with a counter protest — and because these marchers were not there to peacefully showcase their displeasure about a historical figure being immortalized in stone, they lashed out violently. People were pushed and beaten. And then someone drove a van right into the crowd, killing one of the protesters.

* I was recently asked whether it was fair to call these “nationalists” Nazis, and my answer is unreservedly yes. Calling them “nationalists” waters down the message of their ideology. If you are chanting discriminatory things about transgendered people, people of colour, and those of the Jewish faith while holding torches and the swastika — you are a Nazi. Everyone who marches with you, by association, is a Nazi. It’s that simple.

So, can it happen here? That’s the big question, isn’t it? My answer is, sadly, yes — and that’s what’s so frightening.

Fear and violence inspires more fear and more violence. It can create a chain reaction of events on an international scale. When one group of people use violence as a way to deal with what they see as a threatening situation, another group will respond in kind, creating a cycle that is never ending.

And Canada is not immune. Sure, we have small victories. A forum for “nationalists” being held at Ryerson University was cancelled after public outcry, and the University of Toronto has publicly said they will not allow a group of white supremacists to protest on their property. But is it enough to combat the many instances of racism, sexism, and blatant hate this country has seen over the last few years?

During the last federal election, the signs of Muslim candidates were defaced with graffiti, with phrases like “Go Home” scrawled across their property. In January, people were shot while leaving a mosque in Quebec City. There have been numerous instances of neighbours sending letters threatening parents of children with disabilities because they were disturbed and felt these kids shouldn’t be alive. And there is, I’m ashamed to say, many alt-right people who were starting to listen to Kellie Leitch’s rant about RCMP tip lines for those worried about their immigrant neighbours, not to mention the disgusting concept of using “Canadian values” to determine who enters the country.

Hate breeds more hate — and unfortunately, there is still a lot of hate left in Canada. Can that hate turn to violence? Yes, quite easily. But, will it? Not if those of us who are tolerant and compassionate human beings rally together and say enough is enough. People can end the cycle, but only if they do not resort to the same methods as those who initiate the violence and hate.

As grossly cliché as it is, people have to fight hate with love. Already, two rallies are being organized in Toronto as a response to the violence in Charlottestown. If this is how the world responds, in similar fashion to the Women’s Marches in January and February, I have high hopes we will not see the rise of white supremacy or Nazism spread in this country.

God, I hope I’m right.

The Arbour to be first wooden mid-rise in Toronto

In the Fall of 2012, George Brown College opened its doors to the Daphne Cockwell Centre for Health Sciences. Located at the heart of Toronto’s harbourfront in the Queens Quey and Sherbourne area, the stunning architectural design was built to encourage health care graduates with state of the art labs, a rooftop terrace, and tall glass panels meant to introduce the flow of light and wellness. In 2024 , the college hopes to welcome another striking design structure, known as ‘The Arbour’, as part of a sustainability improvement project. The Arbour will be the first 12-storey wooden-framed structure in the heart of Toronto.

The structure is expected to be a carbon-neutral wood building that will produce the same amount of energy it consumes. This balance results in a climate-friendly building adaptable to external changes in temperature. This building is one part of George Brown’s plan to create a low carbon campus by the Toronto shorelines.

The low carbon footprint will create low output of greenhouse gas emissions, often linked as the main cause of global warning and climate change. This is a step in encouraging healthy business practices in the City of Toronto. Adrienne Galway, executive advisor to the president of George Brown College, told Women’s Post that colleges such as George Brown play a critical role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. “This building will be a living laboratory for a low carbon future.” Galway noted that students will have a chance to learn about design, construction , electrical components, and the science behind tall wooden structures by being in one.

While the concept of tall wood buildings may be new to Toronto, George Brown has been following similar designs in Europe, Japan and Australia, where engineers are starting to use more wood to construct buildings. The building will be a unique landmark for the Toronto waterfront with the use of renewable resources and unique beauty.

Vancouver based architect Micheal Green is the lead designer behind contemporary wooden buildings and has studied the science behind the design. To ensure the safety of tall wooden buildings, the wood is treated to have the properties and strength of steel. These massive panels of wood can be fire resistant and even safe during earthquakes.

Safety precautions and testings have been done on other tall wooding buildings, such as the 18-storey student residence Brock Commons building at the University of British Columbia. The building  is set to be open in September 2017 and will be the tallest building in the world made of wood.

George Brown has currently placed a request for qualifications for architects. In the fall, interested and qualified parties will be invited to bid. This design competition will allow an architect to work along with the college to help bring the Arbour to life.

George Brown continues to work on their low carbon campus design and in 2018 they will open a building focused on the future of design. For more information visit georgebrown.ca

5 fall fashion items you need in your closet

This is going to be sad to talk about, but somebody has to do it. Summer is almost over!

Yes it’s a horrible statement, but for those of you that love pumpkin-spice latte season, it shall soon be here. Fall is upon us and just like the blowing winds and changing colours, people’s wardrobes also get a makeover, at least to some extent. It’s best to know a bit in advance what to expect in the stores,so here are the fall fashions you will either indulge or snub this upcoming season.

Dark Florals

Florals — you either love them or hate them. In the spring we see light and pastel floral designs, but this fall look out for dark floral prints. This trend was featured in 2017 pre-fall fashion shows in Milan, Paris and New York. Unlike whimsical floral patters, this fall will focus on dark and romantic florals, laced along lots of black to make the floral designs pop while leaving a sophisticated mystery.

ASOS Bardot Long Sleeve Skater Dress in Dark Base Floral Print CAD 42.80

Two-Tonal Style

Cherry-red and plum will be popular on the streets this season. Cherry-Red was featured a lot during award season earlier this year and even at the 2017 Met gala in May. Red is a striking and romantic colour, meant to evoke sensuality and attraction. Cherry-Red is especially eye catching when combined in a two tonal style with deeper and richer colours, such as plums, the two colours compliment each other. Examples include pairing a red dress with a burgundy jacket, or a plum dress with a pop of Cherry-Red accessories.

Soutache Lace Midi Dress- Nordstrom. CAD 462.32

Off shoulder/ One shoulder Tops

The shoulder is in! Peek-a-boo shoulder tops are definitely still trending and the fall fashion trends are pushing for these one shoulder tops, especially with a full length arm. One shoulder tops offer just the right amount of skin for the unpredictable fall weather. Off Shoulder tops, should make its way through the summer and into the fall. Off shoulder tops, are so trendy because every shoulder is a sexy shoulder.

ASOS One Shoulder Tiered Top CAD 50.95

Leather Pants

Over the years, women have learned to embrace leather again, especially to complete the look for a night out in the fall. Leather pants have  made a return on the runway, including a collection from Calvin Klein, featuring looser, or slouchy leather pants. So more than likely this will join the collection of looser pants that we have seen being worn this summer including tie waist trousers and even those bohemian-themed harem pants, but instead with a bad ass edge.

MANGO Leather Crop Trousers CAD 279.99


Satin and Silk Shoes

One of the best parts of fall has got to be the [fall]DEL shoes and every year people are sucked into buying a new pair of fall booties, even though they have 20. Okay. maybe not all people, but just me? However, fall ankle boots and slip on heels are expected to have a smooth and inviting look, with silk and satin shoes appearing in collections for Oscar de la Renta, Gucci and Prada.

ALDO Nesida CAD 46.98

Let’s see if these runway trends and collections make it into your closet this fall. What trend are you most excited for this fall? Drop a line in the comments below.

4 ways to create your own gourmet kitchen

One of the most important rooms in your house is more than likely your kitchen. You cook there, sometimes you eat there. It becomes a hub of conversation, where friends and family can be creative. One of the things that many people look at when buying a new home is often the kitchen —  it it big enough, bright enough, and does it have state of the art appliances? Many foodies and aspiring chefs (and even amateur ones) love working in a good kitchen. Here are a few tips on how to create your own gourmet kitchen, or at least feel like you’re working with one.

Get Organized

No matter the size of your kitchen, it is essential it be clutter free. This creates the feeling of a grand working place. You should have select storage areas for specialty items and an organizer for everything from your cooking utensils to your excess plastic bags. Keep you kitchen streamlined and know where everything is kept for easy access. In terms of design, keep it minimal and tidy with easy to clean surfaces.

Bright Colours

Thanks to many optical illusions, a room painted in white or even cool bright colours often tend to appear larger. The reflective surfaces of the lighter paint helps a room feel bigger with wider walls. Try to find reflective surfaces that will lighten the room. For instance, white moulding or trim adds depth to a wall and using quality paint provides a bit of shine or gloss helping the flow of light. Avoid darker or muddy colours at all cost. If you want to add a pop of colour to your white space, use colourful appliances.

Invest In The Proper Tools

If you want to work in a high performance kitchen, it might be time to invest in some high performance tools. Try using professionally made pots and pans and especially appliances with a brand you can trust. These products will be worth the investment because they are durable and should last for an extended period of time, making you feel at ease in having a product you can depend on. At the same time, monitor the performance quality of any new appliances you consider investing in and see which one works best for your space.

Gourmet Products

Put the salt and pepper down if that’s your basic seasoning. It’s time to invest in some gourmet spices (and I use the word gourmet as just an upgrade from salt and pepper). Open your mind and your spice rack to different flavours and aromas. Get new spice blends, oils, vinegars and open yourself to trying new flavours. From Peruvian pink salt to pineapple curry, discover new and interesting products.

Let us know how it goes! Post a description of your kitchen in the comments below!

Are you concerned about the quality of your meat?

I’m sure many Canadians would like to know the quality of the meat they pick up from their local butcher’s shop or from the grocery store. Too often there are cases of product recalls due to contamination, health concerns, and even mislabeling of meat products.

In March 2017, the Canadian government banned the import of meats from two Brazilian food plants due to allegations of meat alterations and distribution of rotten meat. Inspectors in Brazil would turn a blind eye for a pay off. It was a major food scandal that affected other countries globally — even the European Union banned imports from these producers and 20 other plants were being investigated at that time by local authorities. I am sure that people would like to ensure the safety of the meat and poultry products we consume in Canada.

In September 2016, the U.S officials from the Department of Agriculture conducted audits on various slaughterhouses across Canada, including Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, and Alberta. A year later, the results of the audits were released to the Canadian Food and Inspection Agency and found that Canadian inspection standards were below the inspection procedures in the United States. There were no inspections done to ensure the cleaning of digestive waste and residual feces on animal carcasses in Canada. Between 2013-2015, 60,000 kg of Canadian meat and poultry products were rejected by the U.S over public safety concerns or not having contamination free carcasses. Despite this being a relatively average number for the period of time, Canadians still want to ensure the quality of the meat they are consuming.

It is not just the quality and contamination of meats that Canadians have to worry about. There is the bigger problem of mislabeling. When it comes to the mislabeling of meat it is a trickier and upsetting battle. People would like to trust the labels that say things like 100 per cent beef or 100 per cent pork. Unfortunately, a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Guelph concluded that one in five sausages tested across Canada contained another meat  that wasn’t listed on the label. This means there is an issue of mislabeling and ‘cross species contamination’.

This information was gathered from 20 per cent of sausage samples from grocery stores across the country. Conclusions showed a number of meat substitutions and fillers — and even one pork sausage contained horse meat. Of 15 turkey sausage packages, five packages were entirely chicken though listed as turkey. The study was funded by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency as a sort of baseline for testing processors and food quality.

The Canadian Food and Inspection Agency responded to the report by saying the results were disappointing and in some cases it may be an issue of poor cleaning of the machinery that causes cross contamination, basic negligence, and finally food fraud with the intent of mislabeling to cut costs. Further investigations are being carried out to ensure cases like this are reduced or non existent.

Let us know in the comments below what changes you would like to see and how you feel about meat handling and mislabeling.