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Cross training tips to enhance running performance

When I first started running, adding any cross training into my workouts wasn’t important …..so I thought until the day I tore my hamstring. It was a day to remember as I was in pain but also upset because I couldn’t run…not even walk properly. My world came crashing down and I didn’t know how I could live without running. It was caused from overtraining and having a poor core. Despite the fact I was in good shape, little did I know  incorporating some cross training would  have made me a stronger and healthier runner.

My visit to my physio suggested I pool run for six weeks. Six weeks seemed an eternity at the time, but I did what I was told.  I didn’t enjoy it at first but knew it was the only activity to keep my fitness. I pool ran three times a week, and once a week,  I would be in the pool for about two hours. This would be considered my long run, mimicking as close as possible if I were running.

During that time I learned about the benefits of cross training and I found water running had given my legs a break as it is low impact. It also added variety to my workouts. I learned to love pool running and still do at times.

Fast forwad, these days I still cross train, but I go to the gym and work on my core strength.  I am injury free ever since and my running has improved.

What I benefitted the most from cross training is that I learned about a new activity such as pool running, pilates and core exercises..

Whether you are new or a seasoned runner it is never too late to add cross training into your workouts. Whether you are injured or not cross training has many benefits.  It will improve your running and keep you in the game.  Visit a personal trainer to get you on the right program.

For more tips from Christine about achieving the perfect running form and how tos regarding avoiding and alleviating seasonal allergies, click the links.

Twitter: @christineruns

YouTube – runwithit

Top running tips for conserving energy with efficient style and form

When I first started running, I had  inadvertently adopted a few poor running habits that zapped my energy and caused me to run slower. To get the most out of my running performance and to stay injury free meant developing good running habits. This is always the key to healthy lifelong running.

I was new to the sport of running and had picked up poor running habits -which was easy to do. Having a busy schedule  led to my  thinking that stretching wasn’t important anymore, and neither was checking the weather conditions. The ramifications, however, can be substantial. By not stretching all of your muscle groups after a run, you are setting yourself up for injury that can shelve your running for six weeks or more. And being unaware of an approaching storm or sudden change in temperature can leave you unprotected from the elements at the worst possible time.

Here are my top five tips for adopting a more efficient running style:

  1. Stretching is not only a workout in itself, it’s an essential component to running that offers many benefits, such as improving your athletic performance through increased flexibility, while substantially lowering your risk of injury. Surprisingly, there are many runners that still don’t stretch. Stretching should be done after a 10-minute warm up jog, and again following your workout when your muscles are warm. Hold each stretch for 60 seconds or do two sets consisting of 30 seconds for each stretch.
  2. Carrying your shoulders high and swinging your hands across your body are counter-productive and will deplete your energy, resulting in poor running economy. To correct this you should run relaxed with your shoulders low. Focus on pumping your arms front to back, and your feet will follow. This allows you to conserve energy, especially while running uphill.
  3. Give yourself at least 90 minutes to digest your food before running, otherwise you may experience muscle cramps or an upset stomach. Always carry a water bottle for longer runs, or choose a route where water is accessible along the way.
  4. Avoid clenching your fists, especially as you become increasingly tired. Keeping your hands relaxed will help you to maintain control without cramping or side stitches.
  5. Always dress for the weather conditions – especially at night – for safety. Wear bright, neon, glow-in-the-dark garments with lights, so you can be seen by cars, buses, bikes, etc. For colder weather, wear layers that can be peeled off, carried, and re-deployed as needed. Older shoes lose their cushioning properties and can lead to injuries such as shin splints.

Before going for that run or participating in an event I always double-tie my laces to avoid losing time in a race or wasting time on a training run. I also wear sun screen, even when running on shaded routes. Suggestion-I wear a running cap with brim that will protect my eyes all year round from the sun and the elements.

Hopefully by following these tips your experience will be that much more enjoyable in the long run. Pun intended!

Twitter: @christineruns

YouTube – runwithit