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Remembering lives lost due to anti-transgender violence

Transgender Remembrance was marked on Nov 20,  a day in which to reflect on the 325 transgender people around the world who have lost their lives between Oct 2016 and Sept 30 of this year.

Statistics Canada tracks the number of hate crimes based on sexual orientation, and in 2014 there were 155 reported cases and in 2015 there were 141 instances. This number is alarmingly high, as most transgender people suffer in silence when dealing with hate related issues.

From people using the right pronouns to challenges in school and healthcare, transgender youth face a large number of challenges. In a national survey in 2015, over one-third of transgender Canadians between ages 14-25 attempted suicide. Transgender Remembrance Day does not normally count the number of deaths by suicide ,but if it did, the number in remembrance would be even higher.

Transgender Remembrance is all about reflecting on an often bullied and low profile community. During different remembrance ceremonies around the world, the names of those who lost their lives to  anti-transgender violence are marked. Members of the trans community all pay respect and come out to attend this somber occasion.

Transrespect.org issued the full list this year of all the names of people around the world who have lost their lives. The list is a report of all transphobia issues and murders worldwide. There was one Canadian listed, Sisi Thibert, a transgender sex worker who was found stabbed in her apartment in Montreal just a mere two months ago.

Many trans-advocates do not just honour all those who have lost their lives, but as well victims and survivors of transgender targeted violence. Transgender remembrance started in 1999 in the United States by a transgender woman to mark the murder of another victim. During the reading of the names, there is often a moment of silence and a candlelight vigil. In Canada, there was a memorial held at the University of Winnipeg on Monday evening with over 100 people in attendance, and at Toronto Police Headquarters in downtown Toronto, Toronto police raised the transgender flag for the first time to mark Transgender Remembrance Day.

GAYPOST: City of Cleveland blames gay bar for hate based violence they experience

The City of Cleveland has come under fire for requesting an ‘action plan’ from a gay bar in response to frequent emergency calls to the bar costing the city money.

The bar, Cocktails Lounge, was recently the backdrop of a violence gay bashing incident where the bartender at contacted emergency services to save a man who was being savagely beaten by a group of young thugs. The bar has had 9 visits from police in the past year and is being treated as if they are responsible for preventing discrimination based violence, you know, the thing that the police exists to stop.

What dimwit Martin Flask fails to realise is that the safety and protection of human beings is worth more than the hundred odd bucks it costs to dispatch a cop car when there is imminent danger.

Read the letter sent to Cocktail’s owner Brian Lyons below:

 

Martin Flask (who casually calls himself Marty this time around) responded to the outcry last night through a statement posted on the city’s website.

Read Martin Flask’s response to Cocktails Lounge below:

As someone who has had the pleasure of visiting Cleveland’s gay scene I can say in total honesty that I have never encountered such a sweet and upbeat gay community in any other city I’ve visited or lived in.

The gay people of Cleveland deserve more from their city officials.

 

 

 

Follow Travis on Twitter at @TravMyers.