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Workout motivation: do, don’t ditch

So, the calendar has an intense workout or long run scheduled but the little devil on the shoulder is making a convincing case to do otherwise. That dilemma is a classic one – even for those fit-as-a-fiddle women who seem to have all their sh*it together. No one is without flaw when it comes to maintaining the perfect workout schedule.  All have dips in motivation, and have bailed on a yoga or gym session without good reason. I know l have days where it takes all I’ve got to not succumb to pressing play to another episode of Easy. For those days when the motivation is lacking, the below list will provide an extra dose of encouragement. Here’s what happens when I actually get in that workout:

Enjoy the rest of the day with feelings of confidence… not guilt.

When the to-do list calls for an intense spin class or sweat-inducing morning of barre, it can be easy to use the I-don’t-feel-like-it excuse and reschedule for tomorrow. Remember that this workout was scheduled by yours truly for a reason. Bite the bullet and… Just. Get. It. Done. I know that guilty feeling that lingers when cancelling a workout. Actually doing it means enjoying feelings of confidence instead.

Feeling sluggish? Look forward to a second wind right afterwards.

Oddly enough, it’s during those evenings when the energy levels feel low and those gym plans feel far-fetched that I end up with a second wind afterwards. Sitting at a desk all day can bring on extra lazy feelings by dinner time but remember that to spur the body into action is to give it a wake up; a much needed one. Enjoy that post-workout energy boost.

Know you’re more likely to be alert while working.

Those morning workout people will often say that setting the alarm for early a.m. hours means arriving to the office alert, happy and ready to go. If mornings at the office are often a slog, perhaps saying yes to even gentle exercise in the morning is a way to combat that and become more productive.

Fit people often have more energy in general.

Have that friend who somehow conquers her runs, yoga practice and dance classes during the week and STILL ends up rock climbing and playing ultimate frisbee on the weekends? Well she’s not actually some super-human freak of nature. Energy breeds energy. To stay on top of the workouts is to kiss lethargy goodbye. Go to the gym during the week and on the weekends, active plans won’t seem so lofty.

Accumulated workouts are an investment in future well-being.

The present-moment version of a person may not want to drop and do those sets of planks but guess what? The future self is the one who most benefits. Getting sweaty today means looking more trim and toned tomorrow. The biggest benefit of all though is creating a healthier, stronger mind and body.

It’s one of the easiest ways to get a mood upgrade.

If these tips have yet to inspire a new, revamped fitness routine, know that today’s workout is probably the quickest route to a better mood. Even a half hour on the treadmill is likely to turn a deflated mood around.

 

Getting race ready

No matter how well my training is going, there is still a seed of doubt about whether I’ll be able to do a personal best on that day. This is normal behavior I am told from my running friends, and it is basically for me to learn how to cope with the pre-run jitters.

The key is to think about all the hard training I have done, and how good I will feel crossing the line. A positive mindset and being prepared before race day will never let me down to perform well.

Here are my top 5 racing tips before I lace up my shoes:

1. Clothing/shoes

What helps settle my pre-race jitters is the night before I figure out what to wear. I dress for the weather conditions and wear moist wicking fabrics to keep me dry and comfortable. I also choose the shoes that are best for the distance I am doing. In addition, I bring an extra change of clothes, socks and comfortable shoes to change into afterwards.

Before lining up to the start I double knot my shoe laces to trip in the race which has almost happened once.

Two other items I bring are Vaseline and Bandaids.

To keep me warm before the start I wear a top that I don’t want and can discard  it when the gun goes off. 

2. Nutrition/Hydrate – The night before, I eat light- for example plain tomato sauce with pasta- I avoid anything too spicy and creamy sauces that will upset my stomach. Lunch is my last big meal before any race day. The morning of, I usually have oatmeal with brown sugar and fruit with milk. That is all I need before the run.

If it is a half marathon or a longer distance I will bring an energy bar and have it halfway through the race. Avoid eating too close to race start as this could lead to problems during the race.  Also, I also keep hydrated leading up to the race. Most big races have water and/or energy drink on the course.

3. Rest – I make sure to have a good  sleep the night before. The previous day to the race, I stay off my feet and relax to music.

4. Stretching- I stretch after my warm-up before the run and after the race. I also do a cool down afterwards. I stretch all of my muscle groups, including calves, quads, hamstrings, groins, I-T bands, arms, upper and lower back.

5. Start slow, finish strong works for me. I start slow and then I make up the time later.  While running I keep my shoulders low and relaxed and pump my arms, especially on the hill sections. Suggestion: have a realistic goal.  Write on a wrist band the times you are hoping to achieve at 5 kms, 10 kms, 15 kms and 20 kms. 

 I try to run my own race and don’t compare myself to others. This will keep me focused, relaxed – the end result I will be running smoothly.

 

Healthy eating tips to complement your workout

As a runner, following a proper program and eating healthy is the perfect recipe for optimum performance and life long running. When I started training for my first 10k, little did I know how important what and how much I was eating could hurt my training.

At the time, I wasn’t making good food choices or eating well balanced meals. I would also skip breakfast or not make the time to eat. This was a huge mistake as I was often depleted after a workout. I also felt low in energy before the workout. The end result my running had suffered and this unmotivated to run.

Taking some time off not from running, I instead looked carefully at my diet. I realized running 5 days per week my body needed more nourishment. Skipping breakfast wasn’t working and eating creamy sauces the night before a long training run had given me an upset stomach.

If I wanted to continue training and see the finish line I needed to change my eating habits.

After doing some research into how to properly fuel my body and seeking advice from a dietitian I began to change my eating habits.

Here are my top 5 healthy eating tips 101 that I still use today:

1. Eat breakfast on a regular basis

Having breakfast fuels my body. I have a lot more energy before the run. Here is what I have on a regular basis – oatmeal with a bit of milk, brown sugar and some fruit. Give yourself a couple of hours before running.

I enjoy having one cup of coffee before heading out the door. I would have though a glass of water to keep hydrated.

2. Make the time to eat – your body will love you

Sometimes it is hard to make the time to eat. If you don’t have the time, bring a snack with you. Snack bar or granola bar and a piece of fruit to get through the workout or afterwards depending how much time you can digest it.

3. Follow a proper meal plan – eat carbs, protein and unsaturated fats. Carbs like a bagel gives me a lot of energy and having pasta, plain sauce with no creamy sauce the night before a big run.

4. Avoid foods that will upset your stomach. If you are not sure try it before the race. I love yogurt but discovered having some before a run upsets my stomach.

5. Keep hydrated. Bring a water bottle with you and drink sips of water throughout the day. Suggested to drink at least 2 liters a day or 8 glasses of water a day.

After a hard effort in a race, my stomach cannot handle food. What I have is a sports drink instead which has electrolytes.

Listening to your body is the key to knowing what foods work for you. See a registered dietitian for advice or more information about following healthy eating for your training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to get rid of that pesky spring cold with 6 home remedies

Spring is officially here! This means warm sunny days are more frequent, and at my own home we all pulled out our spring coats. But, then, snow came once again to throw us back into a second winter. And —oh no—the prickles started! The onset of a cold is here! My throat now burns and feels tight, swallowing is harder, a headache weighs in, and all I can think is ‘where is my bed?’.

‘Tis the season for spring colds and flu! When traditional medicine like cold and flu pharmaceuticals don’t seem to do the trick here are a few remedies to help you and your family through this period, like they do mine:

Rest

No, it is not medicine, but it is the first thing we should do and yet, I am exceedingly bad at it. I tend to go on and on until I fall apart. But resting goes a long way, especially when you start hearing the warning signs that your body is about to enter a fight against a pesky virus. Sleep can do wonders and allows your body the time it needs to gather its strengths and repair itself. So first off, hit the pillow, if you can.

Grapefruit Seed Extract (GSE) and Oil of Oregano

When my throat is itchy one of the first things I do is a mouth wash, several times a day, with either of these products, and it works! But make sure you actually rinse your throat and not just the interior of your mouth. Both of these natural extracts are not only powerful disinfectant but also antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal and antimicrobial. Only a few drops mixed in less than a quarter cup of water will suffice. Just rinse and spit out!

Hydration and citrus water

Though I constantly drink water, when sick it is easy to forget to hydrate. Yet water helps flush out the body’s toxins and sometimes even helps get rid of headaches. But what is even better than water is drinking citrus water and I cannot recommend it enough. Lemons and limes boost the immune system, are a great source of vitamin C and are antiviral and antibacterial. Simply add half a freshly squeezed lime or lemon to 750 ml of water.

 Ginger/Garlic/Lemon/Honey

If the above fails and I am getting sicker, then it is time to pull out the big guns: garlic and ginger. Yes, raw garlic is hard to swallow down. Granted, I might have terrible breath, but, at this point can I still smell? Raw garlic may taste a bit pungent but it is a very effective remedy. It is a super food that is a natural antiseptic, antiviral, antimicrobial and antifungal. It is also a food that can prevent a whole slew of other ailments, amongst which  are cancer, Alzheimer and dementia. So go ahead, have some garlic!

In the recipe below, raw ginger is also added. Ginger not only helps with nausea but also clears the microcirculatory channels. In other words, it helps with soar throat and blocked sinuses.

 Recipe:  

In a container add the juice of two lemons, 1-2 cloves of crushed garlic and a knob of fresh ginger. Use a hand mixer to obtain a smooth texture. Add a touch of honey so as to dimer the sour taste and help sooth the throat. This can be taken as is in small doses, or added to hot water and drunk as a tea.

Mustard Plaster or ‘Mouche de Moutarde

When we were young and in bed, feeling miserable, my father would make us one of these and put it on our chest to provide some much- needed heat. To this day, he still makes this mustard plaster when he is sick. This recipe uses mustard, a rubefacient, which means it stimulates blood flow and will therefore clear the congested airways while providing heat to the chest. However, use with caution as it does get hot and can even burn the skin!

Recipe:

-Mix 2 tbsp. of powdered mustard with 2tsp. of flour or corn starch

-Add water to the mix in order to make a paste

-Deposit the paste on an old piece of cloth to be thrown out afterwards and wrap it up in the cloth so that the skin does not come in direct contact with it.

-Put the cloth on the upper chest

-Leave on for 5 to 30 minutes

WARNING: check every 5 minutes so that the skin is not burning!

Chicken Broth + Love

Should I be visiting my family while sick, my mother will then supply me with her wonderful homemade chicken broth which I sip as I am usually watching some Netflix. I highly recommend homemade chicken broth, if at all possible, as it is a means to warm you up, hydrate, and provide some vitamins. What ever you do, make sure you get yourself some much needed loving, whether it be from a partner, a family member, a friend or a pet, a cuddle always helps!

Keep those sniffles away, but if that is not a possibility follow these tips and you’ll be back to your amazing self in no time.

Cross training tips to enhance running performance

When I first started running, adding any cross training into my workouts wasn’t important …..so I thought until the day I tore my hamstring. It was a day to remember as I was in pain but also upset because I couldn’t run…not even walk properly. My world came crashing down and I didn’t know how I could live without running. It was caused from overtraining and having a poor core. Despite the fact I was in good shape, little did I know  incorporating some cross training would  have made me a stronger and healthier runner.

My visit to my physio suggested I pool run for six weeks. Six weeks seemed an eternity at the time, but I did what I was told.  I didn’t enjoy it at first but knew it was the only activity to keep my fitness. I pool ran three times a week, and once a week,  I would be in the pool for about two hours. This would be considered my long run, mimicking as close as possible if I were running.

During that time I learned about the benefits of cross training and I found water running had given my legs a break as it is low impact. It also added variety to my workouts. I learned to love pool running and still do at times.

Fast forwad, these days I still cross train, but I go to the gym and work on my core strength.  I am injury free ever since and my running has improved.

What I benefitted the most from cross training is that I learned about a new activity such as pool running, pilates and core exercises..

Whether you are new or a seasoned runner it is never too late to add cross training into your workouts. Whether you are injured or not cross training has many benefits.  It will improve your running and keep you in the game.  Visit a personal trainer to get you on the right program.

For more tips from Christine about achieving the perfect running form and how tos regarding avoiding and alleviating seasonal allergies, click the links.

Twitter: @christineruns

YouTube – runwithit

Why your physical wellness is the best investment you can make

It was after harnessing as much courage as I could, that I recently found myself halfway up a mountain on a trail above Medellin, Colombia alone, muddy and incredibly sweaty. The trail, being on a mountain route, was steep and quite challenging at times, yet I was in my element: being outdoors and active has always been my thing. It was just after pausing to take in the landscape that the first drops of rain started to fall. Though I had the energy to keep climbing, I know Colombia doesn’t half-ass its storms. I turned back towards the farmer’s house below. Within minutes, it was deluging with the vibrant orange trails quickly turning to streams. I arrived at the bottom completely soaked with mud marks on my legs and tired muscles.

Moving from Toronto to Colombia has been an interesting personal experiment to say the least (and this is just the beginning). In making a transition like this, I’ve put myself in a situation where I no longer have a large social circle and comforts like my house, my routine, my directional awareness of my surroundings and even my ability to communicate are all gone. When I look at the elements that made up my day-to-day life a mere four weeks ago, there’s only one thing left: my fitness. During this transitional period, I’m glad for that.

I’ve been an active person for my entire life. In the early nineties when I was pint-sized but high energy, I danced, swam and pedaled my pink bike around and around the block. I spent my weekends playing tag and following the current of the stream by my house to see where it led. Soon after, I found my love for distance running and that never waned. I ended up in the fitness and health writing game.

It feels like by spending my youth as an active kid, I unknowingly set myself up to become a more self-sufficient adult. These days, I’m not only thankful that I’ve made myself into a physically active person but I also feel that this is the best investment I could have made. What’s more, is that I think putting time and energy into fitness is one of the smartest things any woman can do.

I spent the past few years writing about health and exercise. Through this work, one of the biggest things I wanted others to recognize is that the benefits of maintaining a decent fitness level go so far beyond looking trim and toned. While the workouts at first may seem to be means towards achieving a certain type of beauty, I don’t think that should be the point. Someone who makes athleticism part of her lifestyle is building a body that’s strong enough to take her on adventures no matter where she chooses to end up. Those activities could range from kayaking to hiking to climbing – you name it. Being fit enough to explore the surroundings through movement, I think, is one of the best things people can do for themselves. Sure, doing those planks and yoga poses may serve an initial purpose but once those ambitions have been realized, I think it’s about being fit enough to jump into physical activity purely for the enjoyment of it. For example, now that I’m spending much of my days on my own, I’m glad that I can hike tough terrain or spend an afternoon running without feeling exhausted. If I was starting from square one during this period, I’m not sure what I’d do.

This sort of a lifestyle is a big contributor to confidence, too. Believe me, moving to a different continent is a great way to test this trait. I may be nervous to venture out into the city (what if I get lost… again?) or talk to a stranger (what if my pronunciation is off… again?) but when it comes to moving my body, I know I’ve got this. With hiking, running or yoga, I know I’m well able to carry myself through – no matter where I am. That’s a confidence booster – one I’m glad for.

Everyone gets their fair share of curveballs to deal with. Keeping up with the workouts, I feel, is probably the best way to be proactive for those crappy days. To run or cycle or commit to those Tuesday night sessions is to contribute to overall wellness. When my body is stronger and fitter, I’m generally happier. When I’ve had a horrible day, I’m able to hit the roads for a tempo run and blow off steam and suddenly, the problem seems to have shrunk itself. Trust me, the workout has the power to benefit overall wellbeing. What woman wouldn’t want that in her life?

By the time I arrived home from my mountain hike in the rain, I was severely uncomfortable. First of all, my shoes were like a pair of waterlogged boats squishing with every step. Secondly, my white tank top was now see-through which, paired with my mud-stained shorts, didn’t make for a good look. The next day, my upper legs, not used to descending down a steep mountain were so sore I could hardly tackle a set of stairs. Still, it was one of the best days I’ve had in Colombia so far. Physical activity is a big part of who I am and I’ll continue to rely on that as I navigate this country. I’ve already planned my next hike here: a route along the spine of a mountain just outside the city.

 

Top running tips for conserving energy with efficient style and form

When I first started running, I had  inadvertently adopted a few poor running habits that zapped my energy and caused me to run slower. To get the most out of my running performance and to stay injury free meant developing good running habits. This is always the key to healthy lifelong running.

I was new to the sport of running and had picked up poor running habits -which was easy to do. Having a busy schedule  led to my  thinking that stretching wasn’t important anymore, and neither was checking the weather conditions. The ramifications, however, can be substantial. By not stretching all of your muscle groups after a run, you are setting yourself up for injury that can shelve your running for six weeks or more. And being unaware of an approaching storm or sudden change in temperature can leave you unprotected from the elements at the worst possible time.

Here are my top five tips for adopting a more efficient running style:

  1. Stretching is not only a workout in itself, it’s an essential component to running that offers many benefits, such as improving your athletic performance through increased flexibility, while substantially lowering your risk of injury. Surprisingly, there are many runners that still don’t stretch. Stretching should be done after a 10-minute warm up jog, and again following your workout when your muscles are warm. Hold each stretch for 60 seconds or do two sets consisting of 30 seconds for each stretch.
  2. Carrying your shoulders high and swinging your hands across your body are counter-productive and will deplete your energy, resulting in poor running economy. To correct this you should run relaxed with your shoulders low. Focus on pumping your arms front to back, and your feet will follow. This allows you to conserve energy, especially while running uphill.
  3. Give yourself at least 90 minutes to digest your food before running, otherwise you may experience muscle cramps or an upset stomach. Always carry a water bottle for longer runs, or choose a route where water is accessible along the way.
  4. Avoid clenching your fists, especially as you become increasingly tired. Keeping your hands relaxed will help you to maintain control without cramping or side stitches.
  5. Always dress for the weather conditions – especially at night – for safety. Wear bright, neon, glow-in-the-dark garments with lights, so you can be seen by cars, buses, bikes, etc. For colder weather, wear layers that can be peeled off, carried, and re-deployed as needed. Older shoes lose their cushioning properties and can lead to injuries such as shin splints.

Before going for that run or participating in an event I always double-tie my laces to avoid losing time in a race or wasting time on a training run. I also wear sun screen, even when running on shaded routes. Suggestion-I wear a running cap with brim that will protect my eyes all year round from the sun and the elements.

Hopefully by following these tips your experience will be that much more enjoyable in the long run. Pun intended!

Twitter: @christineruns

YouTube – runwithit

Runners’ Health: Don’t let allergies hold you back

Spring is here and so is allergy season. There is good news however for allergy sufferers who run, as their condition may now be controlled and prevented if necessary steps are taken. After suffering for long enough, I decided to visit my doctor to learn which of many allergy medications would be the most suitable. I was diagnosed with rhinitis (hay fever) and was prescribed with Flonase (nasal spray) and Reactine,which are taken before the workout and have certainly helped to make my running experience more manageable.

Back in 2001 when I was living in South Korea, my sinuses had to be drained because of extremely high air pollution and more pollen than I could handle…not conducive to comfortable running.

It is difficult enough to run but to have hay fever on top of that makes your workout less enjoyable. So seeking tips as to how to go about diminishing symptoms was my goal during a phone interview with Dr. Jack Taunton, who was chief medical officer for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics.

Dr. Taunton stated” I discovered that certain regions across North America are harsher than others when it comes to allergies. The West Coast of British Columbia is a particularly troublesome place for allergy sufferers because of the vast amount of forested areas and voluminous species of plants and grasses.”

Dr. Taunton further alluded to some people being allergic to certain foods, such as strawberries, some vegetables, dust and pet dander that may trigger an allergic reaction, adding, “Some triathletes are even allergic to certain types of chlorine in the pool,” also showing that for some unlucky people there is no escape. He suggested seeing an allergist (specialist) when symptoms become difficult to manage and to isolate exactly what type of allergy you have.

To summarize, your allergies are caused by the environment or certain foods, according to Dr. Taunton, and the best we can do is try to manage the situation. So what can you do to enjoy your workouts more? “Try breathing more through your mouth,” says Dr. Taunton. Try running when the pollen counts are lowest (check the weather report), wear sunglasses to prevent itchy, watery eyes. Avoid running on trails or in parks at the most dangerous times (for your allergies). Before your workouts, take an antihistamine medication like Reactine. Nasal sprays and eye drops are often available by prescription only. Allergy shots may be the answer and it is also suggested that Green Tea may help provide relief. As already mentioned, however, the best idea is to visit your doctor first to find out if you do suffer from an allergy condition.

Twitter: @christineruns

Instagram – runwithit_christineblanchette

Run With It on YouTube

Making time for you: The value of ‘me time’ and the sanity saver that is girls’ night out

This past weekend my friends and I had a girls’ night. It wasn’t anything wild, just a fancy dinner out on the town, sans kids. Every time we do this (which is never often enough) we promise to make it a regular occurrence – once a month is the goal. Of course, that never comes to fruition.

After each girls’ night, I always feel rejuvenated; and I’m not the only one to notice my improved mood. My husband, kids, and probably even the pup notice as well. My friends say the same thing, and it’s really no surprise why-hanging out with friends, good conversation, a fancy meal that you don’t have to cook or clean up after, and getting to eat while the food is still hot – it’s a dream scenario when you’re a mom.

So, why don’t we make this a priority?

There are a myriad of reasons to not make or keep plans with friends: one of the kid’s is sick, there’s too much to do around the house, the family wants to go on an outing and you don’t know if you’ll be back in time.

Not to mention that it really is hard to get out. One of us may have to stay late at the office, another has a deadline to meet but can’t get it done until the kids are in bed. Some of our husbands do shift work, so coordinating schedules between the group or even just between two or three of us can seem like an insurmountable task.

Then you need to be “in the mood”. I’m exhausted at the end of the week and usually want nothing more than my pajamas, a movie and a glass of wine as my big Friday and Saturday night plans.

There is also the fact that most of us see each other regularly anyway because our kids happen to be friends, we live close by, and are frequently meeting up outside, going for brunch or having play-dates.

The difference is, that kind of socializing isn’t about us – or at least not just about us. In these scenarios we’re wrangling kids, playing referee or constantly being interrupted. It is not relaxing. No conversation is ever completed. And if you’re the one hosting, you can pretty much expect to be cleaning up and re-organizing all the toys for the rest of the week.

We are better people, mothers, wives, workers and friends when we nurture our own needs. This includes taking care of both our physical and mental well-being. Go for that run, get a pedicure, or indulge in a luxurious bubble bath and truly take time for you. Schedule “me time” into your calendar. By making this a priority, will increase your happiness and decrease your stress and give you a needed boost of energy to take on the challenges and demands of motherhood.

Moms – and women in general – have the tendency to put others before themselves. We will arrange play dates, play taxi driver to and from activities, help with homework, cook multiple meals to meet everyone’s tastes, but we won’t stop to carve out time for ourselves. That is a big problem.

This is why girls’ night is different. It is about us. We can talk, confide, commiserate, joke, and brag all we want. We get dressed up, we feel good, and the effects are long-lasting. If you’re a mom who hasn’t made her own friendships a priority, you surely know what I’m talking about.

Let’s try to do better; foster our own friendships, make socializing a part of our routine. As a mom, you need to have a social life outside of your kids’ activities, and one that doesn’t always involve the whole family. I know it clears my head and leaves me feeling refreshed, confident and ready to take on any challenge that lays ahead.

 

‘The Vagina Coach’ on pre- and post-pregnancy

Kim Vopni is known as the “The Vagina Coach”, and is a passionate promoter of female pelvic health in pregnancy, motherhood and menopause.  Pregnancy is an especially important time to pay attention to the pelvic floor because it can make the pregnancy more comfortable, the birth easier and the return to full function more likely.
Vopni is especially passionate about helping women prepare for and recover from pregnancy and birth, while aiding in the process of getting back into shape after the fact. She is a certified personal trainer and a pre/post natal fitness consultant.
 The Vancouver resident understands the importance of pelvic health care and how it can improve and reclaim your fitness level. Vopni’s mission is to help pregnant women have an easier birth and get back into a fitness regimen.
While growing up, Vopni was afraid of birth and never thought she would have children.  “I saw a childbirth video in grade six sex ed. that scared me, and my mother told me about her birth experiences and the resulting challenges she had,” Vopni said. “In 2002, that all changed when I watched my sister-in-law give birth. My vision of what birth was all about changed and it empowered me. The following year, I was pregnant and my research led me to a pelvic floor biofeedback product that helps you prepare for birth.”
Your pelvic floor is a collection of muscles, nerves, tendons, blood vessels, ligaments and connective tissue that are interwoven within the pelvis. The product helps mimic the sensations your pelvic floor will face. An inflatable silicone balloon is inserted into the vagina and guided by a pressure gauge, the user can see when they contract and relax their pelvic floor and they can also familiarize themselves with stretch and what they need to do to yield to that discomfort. The user trains their pelvic floor to respond appropriately during birth
 
“I bought one and had an amazing experience! I decided more women needed to know about this so I became a distributor for that product. That was my introduction to the world of pelvic health and I have never looked back!”
In 2009, she created a workshop called Prepare to Push for pregnant women that was all about preparing for birth and preventing or minimizing the issues many women think are normal after having a baby. These include birth position practice, exercise, pelvic floor release work, restorative exercise to ease back pain, eliminate incontinence, and regain control of your bladder.
“It started as a workshop and is now individual consultations, an e-Course and a book! I use the fitness principle of specificity to prepare the body for birth by mimicking labour and delivery as closely as possible during training. The benefits are a stronger core for delivery, a mind-body connection to the pelvic floor so that women know how to let go of tension when it comes time to give birth, increased confidence and a better recovery.”
Vopni says that runners should make informed choices about their training once pregnant.
  “While running in pregnancy is safe for baby, it places additional strain on the core and pelvic floor,  I recommend scaling back in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters and using the elliptical or better yet, get outside and walk up some hills or stairs.  It’s great cardio, low impact and the core and pelvic floor are better able to manage the loads.”
 As for returning to running postpartum, a pelvic floor physiotherapist should be the one to give you the ‘green light’ to go back.  Wait around four to six months postpartum, provided intentional and deliberate core retraining has taken place first.

For more information about her book Prepare To Push™ – What Your Pelvic Floor andAbdomen Want You to Know about Pregnancy and Birth and her program, go to www.preparetopush.com