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Toronto: A Christmas Prince is the worst holiday movie ever

I hated Netflix’s A Christmas Prince. There, I said it! This royal holiday-themed rom-com is terrible and you should stop watching it right now!

Warning: Spoilers!

The storyline follows journalist wannabe Amber, who finds herself thrust into an assignment covering the return of a playboy prince to his homeland for, potentially, his coronation. After being unable to get any information from the official press sources, Amber sneaks into the castle and poses as a tutor for the Prince’s younger, wheelchair-bound sister. Cue family drama, adoption papers, a coup, romance, and of course, a fancy ball with beautiful gowns.

Sure, some of it is quite cute. The younger sister, Emily, is probably the only good thing about the low-budget film. But, for a journalist, the movie is excruciating. I watched A Christmas Prince with my sister, who got a little frustrated when I kept yelling at the television saying things like “that would never happen” or “my god woman, are you an idiot!”

How on earth did some people watch this movie 18 days in a row! Even Netflix couldn’t believe it.

Suffice to say, I will not be one of the people watching this movie again. Here are a few of the journalistic problems I caught while wasting away for an hour and a half:

Word length and quote misinformation: Before we get into the drama with the prince, Amber is tasked with re-writing a colleague’s article that was double the word limit. His piece also included a quote from someone Amber says was not on the floor, meaning the quote was made up. That is a serious infraction of journalistic standards and would result in a firing of that reporter — or at least a stern talking to by a senior editor.

Newsroom budget: There is no newspaper in North America that would be able to send a random copywriter to a foreign country to cover an inauguration. Either they already have boots on the ground, or they aren’t interested in the Royal Family. Whatever budget this newsroom had — I want it!

Lack of ethics: This woman (I refuse to call her a journalist), sneaks into a home and pretends to be a child’s tutor. In any real scenario, this would get the woman arrested, fined, and possibly jailed. But, in A Christmas Prince, her editor actually encourages her to get lots of photographs and video of the Prince with her phone. While there are instances of journalists going undercover in order to get a story — the rules for doing so are quite strict. Amber is not exposing mistreatment or abuse. Rather, she is invading the personal privacy of a family, including a minor, for personal gain. She is also stealing the identity of a woman who is supposed to be Emily’s tutor. This is unacceptable.

Side note: how come no one in the castle checked Amber’s identification to make sure she had the credentials to spend time alone with a child?

Amber’s “notes”: I want to know how she wrote this story. The film allows viewers a sneak into the “questions” Amber has about the prince, all of them really simplistic. She also includes little tidbits like “I have to dig deeper”, as if, as a journalist, she needs to remind herself to do her job. In fact, her notes read more like a diary – “I think I’m finally starting to get to know the real prince…so not what I thought” or “The prince is definitely starting to trust me…but can’t seem like I”m prying.” All of these notes indicate a malicious attempt to invade someone’s privacy, not a journalist objectively writing down the facts of a story.

Objectivity and blackmail: At some point in the movie, Emily finds out that Amber isn’t actually her tutor and is, in fact, a reporter. Instead of kicking her out of the castle, Emily blackmails Amber into writing a positive story about her brother, or rather “the truth” as she puts it. Amber agrees. While the prince may not have been a playboy, Amber is still negotiating with a source.

Theft of private property: Amber finds the prince’s adoption papers in his father’s cottage getaway and takes them with intent to print. First of all, these documents were procured out of a lie. Second of all, they were not simply sitting on a table where Amber happened to come upon them. She searched through desks, diaries, and papers, and stole them!

Basic security notes: After finding the adoption papers, Amber is interrupted by the prince, who asks her to go for a walk. She says “one minute,” throws her coat on, and leaves the room — leaving all of the private documents on her bed for anyone to find! Journalism 101 indicates that if you have a private document or source, you should do all you can to secure those documents.

I’m not even going to touch upon the bias that presents itself when you fall in love with the subject of your story.

In the age of fake news, it is incredibly important to represent journalism in a fair and accurate way. A Christmas Prince should be ashamed that it is catering to the

What did you think of A Christmas Prince? Let us know in the comments below!

What you need to know about net neutrality

Net neutrality is all over the news. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC), with the support of U.S. President Donald Trump, wants to repeal the net neutrality laws put in place to create a more equal and open Internet. People gathered in 700 different cities across the United States (mostly outside Verizon stores) to protest these changes.

But, what exactly does this mean and why are people so upset? Women’s Post has you covered with this super easy to understand (and perhaps overly simplistic) primer:

What is net neutrality?

Net neutrality is essentially equality on the Internet — all data must be treated the same by all providers, browsers, and platforms. It prevents these companies from slowing down service (or preventing access entirely) to website, applications, and other features from competitors. Internet providers can deny access to certain sites either because you don’t pay enough or because they have their own service they would rather customers use.

For example, in 2014, Comcast got caught slowing down streaming on Netflix, and AT&T started a program that required apps to pay more money in order to ensure they used less data. All of these things gave certain platforms and applications an advantage over others.

What happened in 2015?

In 2015, President Barack Obama encouraged the FCC to regulate broadband Internet providers as a public utility, recognizing the Internet as a service necessary for economic and social growth, as well as a tool for innovation. Internet was reclassified as a telecommunications service in order to justify the change. Telecommunication companies are exempt from any kind of price control. It also led to more government control over broadband traffic.

In short: companies were not allowed to block or slow down the content of their rivals.

What is happening now?

Trump was elected and wants to overturn everything Obama has done. This includes net neutrality. What are the arguments for net neutrality? Republicans believe the government oversight associated with Open Internet was slowing investment in the technology.

Without net neutrality, it would also allow carriers like Verizon and AT&T to offer tiered pricing for Internet access — the more a person pays, the faster they get their Internet. Those who agree with the appeal say this will create a more stable marketplace and remove barriers for investment.

However, without net neutrality it becomes difficult for emerging technology companies or startups to get the same amount of speed as other sites. There will be no guarantee your site wouldn’t be blocked or that it won’t lag when potential customers come to use your product. There is also a socio-economic concern — if you have to pay more for Internet access that works; what will this mean for those who can’t afford it?

The new rules are scheduled to be voted on next Thursday, December 14.

What do you think? Should the U.S. repeal net neutrality? Let us know in the comments below!

Hot and new fall TV shows to watch out for

September and October are a TV junkies’ dream, with the hottest new shows premiering across all networks.

Every year we are blessed with new shows that stick around for years — gems such as Empire, This is US, Scandal, Chicago Fire, The Blacklist, and others that are huge successes. While it can be hard to tell which new shows will make it, it’s always exciting to test them out and add them to your cozy evening fall lineup. Women’s Post has decided to compile a list of the most buzzworthy new shows, reboots, and spinoffs coming to your television screen this season.

NEW SHOWS

For The People: ( ABC/NBC) TBA

In true Shondaland style, this new drama follows a group of young lawyers navigating their first cases. Classed as the new look of justice this show offers up lots of drama and juicy cases.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KjnaAd2sO4]

Alias Grace: ( CBC) September 25 2017

This highly anticipated show is based on the best selling novel by Margaret Atwood. The show follows a housekeeper in 1843 accused of murdering her employer.

The Good Doctor: ( ABC) September 25 2017

This media drama follows a paediatric surgeon with autism. The doctor will be portrayed by Freddie Highmore, who played Norman Bates from A&E’s popular Bates Motel.

Marvel’s Inhumans: ( ABC) September 29 2017

Based on the Marvel comic of the same name, this show offers a rare look into Marvel super-humans from a royal family that have decided to head back to earth.

Ten Days in the Valley: ( ABC) October 1 2017

This drama packed series follows a TV producer dealing with the disappearance of her child, revealing secrets along the way.

S.W.A.T: (CBS) November 2 2017

Two words … Shemar Moore

Me, Myself & I: (CBS) September 25 2017

This interesting take follows a man at three points in his life. This new comedic twist and storytelling looks promising.

Law and Order: True Crime ( NBC) TBA

This is the latest out of the classic Law and Order empire. Created by Dick Wolf, this show’s first season will feature a dramatization of the real life crime: The Menendez Murders.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xh01uHWc15Q

The Gifted: ( FOX) October 2 2017

Mutants have returned in this hot new fall show. The series is loosely based on Marvel’s X- Men and will have relation to some of the previous films.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTzW9rMcbzk

Life Sentence: (CW) January 2018

Despite not starting this fall, this show is still worth a mention. This feel-good comedy highlights the important part of living your best life possible. It follows a young woman who learns she is cancer free and no longer terminally ill.

 

SPIN OFF’S 

Young Sheldon- A spinoff prequel for the popular TV show, Big Bang Theory

College-ish – A spinoff of Blask-ish

REBOOTS

2017 might be the year of reboots, and I’m not mad about it. Are you excited for Will & Grace and Roseanne?

 

Did we miss any? Let us know in the comments below which fall tv shows you are most excited for.

The Gilmore Girls Revival I wanted to love

Warning: slight spoilers ahead. But no, I would never reveal the last four words. That would just be mean.

There are very few television shows that make me more emotional than Gilmore Girls. It’s one of those feel-good comedy dramas that makes everything better, even if the episode leaves you sobbing into your pillow while eating a bucket of ice cream.

Gilmore therapy — that’s what I call it.

To give you an idea of how much I love the show, back in October, I stood in a line for nearly two hours to get some free coffee at a pop-up Luke’s Diner. Despite the fact that I knew I would get nothing more than a coffee sleeve, I stuck it out anyways. So, when Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life, came out on Netflix on Friday, I knew I needed to make it quite the affair.

I invited my girlfriends and fellow Gilmore girls to my place on Saturday morning to binge the revival. The table was covered in snacks Gilmore-style. We had the staples — poptarts with an apple centerpiece, tater tots, marshmallows, smartfood popcorn, and pizza — as well as a few “healthy” options we barely touched. Dressed in sweat pants, sweaters, and some plaid, we all settled in for what we knew would be an incredibly long emotional rollercoaster. After watching the last two episodes of the original season, we dived in to the revival; ready for whatever the writers were going to throw at us.

Note: we started watching television around 11:30 a.m. and we finished around 9 p.m. I think I can say I’ve officially mastered the binge.

It’s taken a few days to digest my feelings about the show, but after much consideration, I would give the revival a solid b-minus. The theme was very much about transitions — what you do when life throws you a curveball. Emily, Lorelai, and Rory Gilmore are each struggling to get their lives back on track, and each challenge brings the family closer together. Emily must deal with the loss of her husband, Richard, who was played by the late Edward Herrmann. Lorelai is in a rut, both in her relationship with Luke and in her professional life at the Dragonfly Inn, unable to move forward. And Rory is jumping from guy to guy with no set clear path career wise.

There was a lot to love about the revival. Kirk’s film and his oooooo-ber business, Paris taking the heads off of Chilton’s next generation, and of course the extensive cameo list. There were moments that made me snort in my coffee and cry into tissues. The draft of the book entitled “The Gilmore Girls” was a cute add-in that I really enjoyed. And, of course, the set of Stars Hallow was still as beautiful and quirky as ever.

But —and while it it pains me to say it — there was a lot lost in the new four episodes.

What appealed to me about the original series was the strength of the characters. These ambitious women tackled problems independently, without aide or dependence from their partners. They were comfortable with who they were. It’s also one of the few shows that didn’t have unnecessary relationship drama (the emergence of April notwithstanding). The boyfriends, fiancés, and husbands were always there, but they were never the focus. The only relationship that mattered was that between mother and daughter.

But those strong characters completely deteriorated in the revival. Rory, the bookworm that stole my heart and soul so many years ago, lost all her journalistic fire. Where was the woman that sent out hundreds of resumes by hand or harassed an editor in his office with a book full of writing samples and a handful of pitches? It seemed like she was just waiting for opportunities that were presented to her instead of going out and finding a story, something the old Rory Gilmore would have done in an instant. Professional life aside, where was the girl that fled the country after realizing she was “the other woman” in an accidental affair? Now, the character seems to have completely devolved, actively engaging in an affair with an engaged former beau. And what about poor Paul!!

And then there were the fillers. The Stars Hallow musical, for example, was strange and way to long. Yes, it gave Carol King an opportunity to make a cameo, but it was 15 minutes of weird unnecessary song and dance from two Broadway stars that worked with the writers on other projects. Also, the 30-something gang was kind of offensive. It perpetuates the false stereotype that millennials are lost and apathetic, mooching off their parents and spending their time watching YouTube and doing weird Internet challenges. Kudos to Rory for not getting caught into it all, but I was hoping she would get them involved in the Stars Hallow Gazette to prove they had actual purpose.

All in all, Gilmore Girls: A Year In The Life fulfilled my withdrawal. It had enough good moments to counter some of the bad, and it presented a great opportunity to get together with friends and eat a ton of junk food. The last four words were worth waiting for, and it does bring the story full circle, ending the revival in an intriguing and suspenseful way, but also leaving room for a possible continuation.

I hope that if Netflix does decide to keep Gilmore Girls running, they do a bit of a better job at returning the characters to their former glory. I really wanted to love the revival, and I really want to love whatever Netflix decides to do with the show next. Until then, I’ll just say this:

I smell snow. 

 


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A little Stars Hallow in Toronto – Pop-Up Luke’s Diner

I left my house at 6:30 in the morning excited and ready to experience something I’ve only ever dreamed of — getting coffee from Luke’s Diner, a staple set on the comedy-drama TV show, Gilmore Girls.

I’ve followed the escapades of Lorelai and Rory Gilmore for most of my life. I laughed when Rory stole a box of cornstarch after her first kiss; cringed whenever Taylor Doosey led a town meeting; swooned when Sookie and Jackson finally went on a date; and cried my eyes out when Lorelai broke up with Luke (both times), leading to a recovery Gilmore-esque feast of pop-tarts and marshmallows.

Not only was the show full of quick-witted dialogue and loveable characters, but it showed a side of teen drama that wasn’t boy-obsessed or filled with unnecessary dating triangles.

While Gilmore Girls did touch on relationships, it also showcased developed characters who cared more about their ambitions than who they were going out with at night. In fact, no Gilmore girl would ever settle or change their lifestyle for a guy, and that’s something I really respected and learned from as a young girl.

And then there was Rory Gilmore. She was a bookworm — smart, academically driven, and completely comfortable with who she was. As she struggled to figure out what it meant to be a teen, a university student, and then an adult, so did I. I watched as she pursued journalism in high school and university, struggling to befriend her nemesis Paris Geller, and fought for her perfect study tree. In the end, she succeeded in getting a job in journalism, something that gave me hope as I ventured out into a similar profession.

After years of watching this show over and over again (thanks Netflix), I was ecstatic to hear there would be four pop-up “Luke’s Diners” in Toronto. I knew I had to go, even if it would mean being slightly late for work. The line was already around the corner when I arrived around 7:15 a.m. and took my place among a sea of plaid, flannel, and backwards baseball hats. While I waited for my free coffee, I chatted with the group of women around me, discussing our favourite episodes and arguing about whether Rory should have married Logan, or stayed with Jesse or Dean.

As the line unravelled and I got closer to the storefront, I saw the sign. Luke’s Diner, just like the show. I snapped a photo and moved inside the independent coffee shop The Rolling Pin, near Lawrence and Yonge. After a bit of a wait got a coffee with a sleeve that said Luke’s Diner. The cup itself had one of my favourite quotes on them (Coffee please and a shot of cynicism).

And then…I left. That was it. I stood in line for one and a half hours for a picture of a sign and a cup of coffee with a marketing sleeve.

20161005_084332_hdrI’m not sure what I was expecting, but I know it was more than that. I thought the music of Carol King, the singer of the infamous theme song “Where You Lead”, would be playing in the background. I thought there would be cut out of the characters and a list of Luke’s diner rules plastered in large print on the wall (it was there, but it was typed on regular printing paper and tapped messily on the wall). I also thought they would be selling some cool Gilmore Girl merchandise — which was honestly a lost opportunity because the group I was with would have purchased anything after that wait! Baseball hats, tshirts, even roasted coffee with the words “Luke’s Diner” would have sold like, well, Luke’s coffee!

 

I know these pop-ups are marketing ploys, but a little more effort could have been made to make the experience more complete. Netflix could have provided a lot more in terms of supplies. I don’t think the coffee shops had enough time to do any sort of re-decorating and some of them struggled with the mass amount of people waiting to enter their storefront.

Suffice to say, it was a great idea, but it was all poorly executed. With the Gilmore Girl revival coming to Netflix in November, you would think there would be more of a fanfare. You know, Lorelai Gilmore style?

But, I got my picture with a Luke’s Diner sign. So, I guess that’s okay.

Oy with the poodles already — am I right?

20161005_100734_hdr

Miss Representation: A Misrepresentation In Itself

With a society that’s always plugged in, its difficult to get away from the media. Our lives revolve around TV, music, video games, and movies. However, it is only recently that audiences are starting to realize what the content of the media is doing to society– especially women. Although powerful campaigns and initiatives are being launched in order to showcase and prevent the misogyny present in society, there is still a lot of work that needs to be done.  Miss Representation is a documentary recently released on Netflix that brings forth what most of us are slowly becoming desensitized to; women in the media.

Consisting of interviews from a group of experts, the hour and a half film dissected the various aspects of the media that sexualize, dehumanize, and objectify women. Pat Mitchell (MA, President and CEO for the Paley Center for Media, former President and CEO of PBS); Jennifer Pozner (Executive Director of Women in Media & News); Caroline Heldman (PhD, Associate Professor of Political Science at Occidental College); Marie Wilson (founding President of the White House Project); and Condoleezza Rice (Secretary of State) are just some of the personalities that sat down to talk about the representation of women in the media. Montages of Reality TV stars in bikinis, journalists in low-cut tops, and pictures taken between Sarah Palin’s legs demonstrated the problem overtly and effectively. However, Miss Representation also indirectly brought forth other problems present in the media. Problems hardly spoken about by the line of experts and celebrities. But problems that are still there.

Women of colour (WOC), women with disabilities (WWD), and the LGBT community also should have been addressed. WWD are essentially non-exsistent while women of colour and LGBTs are also significantly underrepresented. Although Devanshi Patel, a young, WOC aspiring to have a career in public service, was briefly profiled in the documentary– she was essentially what WOC are in the media; ‘the token brown girl’ of the documentary. It would have been nice to see a discussion of the misrepresentation of celebrities such as Mindy Kahling or Sofia Vergara, who are known solely for their skin colour and foreign accent, respectively. The montages in Miss Representation showcased a series of privileged, white women who steal the spotlight time and time again. But it should be known, problems of sexualization, age discrimination, and objectification also apply to WOC and the LGBT community as well. Nicki Minaj, Rihanna, and yes, even Queen Bey always leave little to the imagination. Now whether their anacondas are actually empowering or objectifying is a conversation we all need to have. In addition, Mitch and Cam of Modern Family and Ellen DeGeneres are essentially the only representatives of the LGBT community and that too, from a comedic standpoint.

Essentially, the documentary didn’t consist of anything we didn’t already know. Women are no longer wear as much clothes as they used to, and the Kardashians are, whether we like it or not, plotting to take over the world. A powerful film would’ve been one that consisted of briefly showcasing the problems women face in the media followed by actual solutions to resolve said problems. Women need to stop victimizing themselves and need to start helping themselves- and most importantly each other.  All in all, Miss Representation kind of, well, missed the spot.

 

Rating: 6/10