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Roseanne Barr tearfully apologizes, says she lost everything

Last weekend during an emotional interview with Rabbi Shmuley, Roseanne Barr admitted how she lost everything and regrets her racist comments.

For those who don’t know, Barr’s hit series was rebooted and set to make a comeback until a series of racist tweets against former President Obama’s top aide, Valerie Jarrett, was made. In a tweet that is now deleted, Barr wrote: “Muslim brotherhood & planet of the apes had a baby=vj,” which was in reference to Jarrett. Though Barr initially said she was joking, she soon deleted the tweet and wrote an apology to Jarrett and all Americans.

ABC caught wind of the incident and quickly cancelled the reboot.

In a transcript of Barr’s interview with Shmuley, she said, “Of course, no I don’t excuse it. I horribly regret it. Are you kidding? I lost everything, and I regretted it before I lost everything. And I said to God, ‘I am willing to accept whatever consequences this brings because I know I’ve done wrong. I’m going to accept what the consequences are,’ and I do, and I have. But they don’t ever stop. They don’t accept my apology, or explanation. And I’ve made myself a hate magnet. And as a Jew, it’s just horrible. It’s horrible.” She then broke down crying.

She added that she never thought Jarrett was a black woman. “I know it’s a form of racism to assume every person who looks white is white. But it’s a mistake that a lot of people make. People make that mistake about me all the time. They don’t know I’m a Jew. […] It was an insensitive thing for me, but it’s the reason, and I’m just gonna’ own my reason. I can’t let anyone else say I did it because I’m a racist, because I didn’t.”

She also said that people have said she compared Jarrett and black people to monkeys, but she tried to clarify that that wasn’t what she said. “Here’s what I said. I know the history of the world, and racism and how it affects people. I’m not ignorant. But I’m stupid sometimes. […] I’ve always worked with black women. I’ve done that since the sixties. And you know it still creeps in. I am so sorry and humiliated and you know, angry at myself. But in my heart I just made a stupid error.”

At the time of the tweet, some people involved with the show, including Sara Gilbert and Wanda Sykes, respectfully said that Barr doesn’t speak for everyone in the cast and they would no longer be returning.

Even though Roseanne was cancelled, a spin-off called The Connors was given the green light and will be airing in the fall with 10 episodes already on the way. Original cast members such as John Goodman, Laurie Metcalf, Sara Gilbert, Lecy Goranson, and Michael Fishman will be returning. According to Today, the cast collectively released a statement saying, “We have received a tremendous amount of support from fans of our show, and it’s clear that these characters not only have a place in our hearts, but in the hearts and homes of our audience. We all came back last season because we wanted to tell stories about the challenges facing a working-class family today. We are so happy to have the opportunity to return with the cast and crew to continue to share those stories through love and laughter.”

The Roseanne reboot cancellation

The sitcom Roseanne was never perfect. The original series ran out of steam and plummeted in the ratings, barely cracking the top 20, and it fizzled out all together after a slightly funny, but mostly confusing and maligned journey of the Connor’s antics after winning the lottery, and ended with a dramatic monologue by Roseanne, the gut punch that Dan Connor had died of a heart attack, and a ponderous TE Lawrence quote.

The Roseanne show always meant a lot to me. Darlene Connor is one of the most authentic and real depictions of a teenager ever. One of the benefits of a sitcom is that the actors play true to their real age, unlike dramas where the “teens” are in their twenties. Darlene explored atheism, her writing, went through a major depression that helped me with my own, and blossomed in her relationship with David. This romance wasn’t something that happened offscreen but was built up in front of the viewer’s eyes from the first kiss to an eventual wedding.

Despite the drama of the whiplash recasting of Becky, and the return and departure again of the original actress, the oldest daughter eloped as a teen after lashing out at Dan for ruining her life by failing to make a go of his beloved bike shop. Seeing Becky run off to get married was one of the most shocking things I’d ever seen on TV.

So being a mega fan, who has a complete box set that survived a DVD purge, it felt like a miracle to have new episodes of the show. But I approached the new season with cautious optimism. Roseanne doesn’t have a good track record. (Does anyone remember her attempt at a talk show? It had a cool set that revolved from a living room set to a kitchen, and even had Oprah as a guest. But it quickly crashed and burned.) I unfollowed her from Twitter because of her over the top support for the 45th POTUS and all his misdeeds.

I was weary when I read that Roseanne Connor would also be a rabid supporter of the president, but I justified this with it made sense that a working-class family from the American heartland would vote for a candidate that promised jobs.

Roseanne Barr persisted on Twitter with her disheartening rhetoric, and got the show canceled, and I’ll never find out what became of the Connors, but my curiosity is not worth Roseanne Barr having a platform for her vile racism.

Roseanne has sunk a promising reboot for the cast, crew, and the fans. While I would like to see the Connors continue on minus Roseanne, I question the people that thought it was a good idea to turn the Roseanne character back into the hands of Roseanne Barr.

Here’s the quote that ended the original series finale, “Those who dream by night, in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that all was vanity; but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dream with open eyes, and make it possible.” What? How does this encapsulate the lives of the Connor family?  It doesn’t.