It’s cold in Canada. Really cold. And when it is this frigid, I like to dream of a warm oasis, with beaches, palm trees, and drinks with little umbrellas. I want to wear a bathing suit, go on long hikes through forests or fields, and enjoy views that don’t look like feathers attacked the skyline.

There are loads of resorts you can go to in order to escape the cold. But, Sure, if you want to go somewhere with real culture and adventure, take a look at Hawaii.

Here are the top five things to do:

Explore a volcano (or two): There are five active volcanoes in the state of Hawaii, and most of them can be found on the Big Island. The Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is located 45 miles southwest of the town of Hilo and encompasses 333,000 acres from the summit of Maunaloa to the sea. It’s worth a full day trip as there are 50 miles of hiking trails that will take you through volcanic craters, deserts, rainforests, a walk-in lava tube, and two active volcanoes. If you want a bit of more of a challenge, try hiking 10,023 feet up to the summit of Haleakala on Maui Nu. If you time it just right, you will be able to witness a breathtaking sunrise. Make sure to register, as this 4:30 a.m. time slot has become quite popular with tourists.

Live in the water: Water activities are incredibly popular in Hawaii for obvious reasons. If you are new to water sports, that’s okay. Take a surfing lesson in Kona with fantastic instructors who will take you through techniques on land and sea! You can take part in a private lesson or a group lesson. If you already know how to surf, the facility also does board rentals. Hit historical Honokohau Beach for some beginner waves or the deep waters of Lymans, Ali’i Drive in Kailua-Kona, for those looking for a challenge.If you want a break from the more physical activities, put on a snorkling mask and check out the colourful fish and reefs that live below the surface.

Visit the other islands: While most people know of the Island of Hawaii, many do not realize there are other islands part of state. Make sure to spend time exploring those other parts of the Hawaiian Islands. For example, Molokini is a small, crescent moon-shaped island that is actually a partially submerged volcanic crater. It is also a bird sanctuary and home to a lot of marine life. The water is so clear, you hardly need your snorkling gear. You can also take a tour of Oahu, which hosts the city of Honolulu, the state’s capital. Visit Pearl Harbour, the Byodo-in Temple, or a Kualoa Ranch.

Tour the farms: Hawaii is known for it’s eco-tourism. There are a number of farms and plantations on the islands, and each one is worth checking out. In Hanolulu Botanical Gardens, you can learn about the farm-to-table process that is a pivotal part of Hawaiian culture. On the island of Kauai, there is a working coffee plantation and a green taro field. Taro (Kalo) is a root starch cultivated and exported from the Island all over the world. Visit the Kanepuu Preserve on Lanai for a self-guided tour featuring 48 species of indigenous plants or check out the pineapple fields that grow through the centre of the Island. Just make sure to do your research or ask for guidance so you don’t upset any of the natural eco-system during your tours or hikes.

Whale watching: Between January and March, over 10,000 humpback whales travel to the shores of Maui from Alaska to mate. You may catch a glimpse of these majestic animals while you are lying on the beach, surfing, or even scuba diving, but the island also offers cruises along the route, fully decked with underwater cameras that will help guide the boat to “guaranteed” whale sightings. All whale watching is partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, who helps educate visitors on conservation and the relationship between Hawaiians and the sea.

Make sure to pack your best running or hiking shoes, along with a number of layers for all these different activities.

Have you visited Hawaii? Let us know what your favourite thing to do was! 

 

Author

Katherine DeClerq is the editor of Women's Post. Her previous writing experience includes the Toronto Star, Maclean's Magazine, CTVNews, and BlogTO. She can often be found at a coffee shop with her MacBook computer. Despite what CP says, she is a fan of the Oxford comma.